American Abolitionists and Antislavery Activists:
Conscience of the Nation

Updated February 14, 2017










l to r: Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips




American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS)


American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), founded in New York City, December 1833, disbanded 1870; published The Emancipator and The Anti-Slavery Standard; had 1,350 affiliated societies and 250,000 members in 1838. By 1840, there were 2,000 affiliated societies. The Anti-Slavery Society was part of a larger religious revival that believed that slavery was a sin and that slave-holders were sinners.  In addition,it was part of a reform movement of the period, which included women's rights, temperance, and prison reform.  It had agents that traveled throughout the country producing lectures, distributing anti-slavery journals, and organizing local anti-slavery societies. It petitioned Congress to end slavery immediately in the District of Columbia and in any Federal territories. There was much opposition to the Anti-Slavery Society in the North, especially from business owners who depended on imports from the slave states. Ultimately, the American Anti-Slavery Society was the largest and most influential abolitionist organization in the United States.  Officers and representatives of the AASS were often members of other abolitionist and anti-slavery organizations as well. (References)

This is an ongoing compilation of leaders and officers of the American Anti-Slavery Society.  This list is drawn principally from the Annual Reports of the Society that were published annually (with some gaps).  We have compiled an alphabetical list of the officers, board members, and representatives of the Society.  We will be adding more names to this list, and it will be updated periodically.

Please refer to master roster of abolitionists, anti-slavery activists and opponents of slavery for full biographies and references for these individuals.  Also see the illustrated list of abolitionists and anti-slavery activists for images of these individuals. 

  • Chapter by Henry Wilson: “National Antislavery Convention at Philadelphia: Organization of the American Antislavery Society,” by Henry Wilson, in History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, 1872
  • Principal Leaders of the American Anti-Slavery Society
  • Officers and representatives of the American Anti-Slavery Society

Chapter by Henry Wilson: “National Antislavery Convention at Philadelphia: Organization of the American Antislavery Society,” by Henry Wilson, in History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, 1872:

The New England Antislavery Society, at its first anniversary, adopted a resolution, introduced by Mr. Garrison, instructing its board of managers to call a meeting of the friends of abolition to form a national antislavery society. No definite action, however, was taken.

In the autumn of 1833 Evan Lewis, a member of the Society of Friends, conductor of" The Friend," an antislavery journal in Philadelphia, and a man of whom it was said " he was afraid of nothing but being or doing wrong," visited the city of New York to persuade leading Abolitionists to unite in calling a national convention. A small meeting was held, at which, after considerable discussion, it was voted, by a mere majority, to call such a convention at Philadelphia, on the 4th of the following December. Many Abolitionists, however, entertained serious doubts whether the time had come for holding a convention for that purpose. Nor is it a matter of surprise that such should have been the fact. It required principle, nerve; moral courage, and a martyr spirit thus to lead the forlorn hope of a then most unpopular cause; more even than when, under the cover of comparative obscurity, the New England society was organized. It was a time, too, of feverish excitement, exasperation, -and intense bitterness of feeling, word, and act; when the mob violence of the street was but the counterpart of the similar though more decorous demonstrations of the counting-room, the parlor, and the church. The Colonizationists had always manifested hostility to the antislavery cause. Their society had declared in 1828, four years before the organization of the New England Antislavery Society, that “it is in no wise allied to any abolition society in America or elsewhere; and is ready, when there is need, to pass a censure upon such societies in America." The organization of societies pledged to immediate emancipation, the successful visit of Mr. Garrison to England, his unaccepted challenge of their champion to public discussion, the protest of Wilberforce and his compeers against their scheme, had so incensed its friends that even professedly Christian men were prepared to justify a resort to almost any measure to oppose and put down what they deemed a pestilent heresy. To go to Philadelphia at such a time and on such an errand was anything but a holiday affair.

On the evening preceding the assembling of the convention, a meeting of some thirty or forty delegates was held at the house of Evan Lewis, who had been chiefly instrumental in its convocation at that time. Lewis Tappan of New York presided. A committee was appointed to secure the services of some well-known citizen and philanthropist of Philadelphia to ' preside over the convention. Thomas Wister, a member of the Society of Friends, declined the invitation. The committee then invited Robert Vaux, of the same denomination; but he declined, though an Abolitionist. As the committee retired, not a little mortified and irritated at their ill success, Mr. May, one of their number, reports that Beriah Green sarcastically remarked; " If there is not timber amongst ourselves big enough to make a president of, let us get along without one, or go home and stay there till we have grown up to be men."

The convention assembled at the Adelphi Buildings, on the 4th of December. Beriah Green of the Oneida Institute, in the State of New York, was elected president; and Lewis Tappan of the city of New York, and John G. Whittier of Massachusetts, were made secretaries. These officers were thus pleasantly characterized by Mr. J. Miller McKim, one of the youngest members of the convention, and ever since an active Abolitionist.

"A better man than Mr. Green could not have been selected. Though of plain exterior and unimposing presence, he was a man of learning and superior ability; in every way above the average of so-called men of eminence. Mr. Tappan; who sat at his right, was a jaunty, 1na11-of-the-world looking person, well dressed and handsome; with a fine voice and taking appearance. Whittier, who sat at his left, was quite as fine-looking, though in a different way. He wore a dark frockcoat with standing collar, which, with his thin hair, dark and sometimes flashing eyes, and black whiskers, - not large, but noticeable in those unhirsute days, -- gave him, to my then unpracticed eye, quite as much of a military as a Quaker aspect. His broad, square forehead and well-cut features, aided by his incipient reputation as a poet, made him quite a noticeable feature in the convention."

It was then voted that delegates from antislavery societies, and all other persons in favor of emancipation without expatriation, be entitled to seats in the convention. Its sessions ·continued during three days. The members were admonished by the police not to hold evening sessions, as they could not be protected after dark. Committees were appointed to prepare a constitution, nominate a list of officers, and draft a ·declaration of principles, to which the signatures of members should be affixed. That committee consisted of Dr. Edwin P. Atlee of Philadelphia, Elizur Wright, Jr. of New York, William Lloyd Garrison of Massachusetts, Simeon S. Jocelyn of Connecticut, David Thurston of Maine, John M. Sterling of Ohio, William Green, Jr. of New York City, John G. Whittier of Massachusetts, William Goodell of New York, and Samuel J. May of Connecticut.

On the second day of its session the convention, on motion of the Rev. Charles W. Denison, editor of the “Emancipator," voted to take measures to ascertain how many clergymen in the United States were slaveholders; and a committee of three was chosen to carry the resolution into effect. It was then moved by John Rankin of New York that the thanks of the convention be extended to those editors who have embarked in the cause of emancipation, and that to their support in the good work the members pledge their individual and collective influence. Upon this resolution the convention resolved itself into a committee of the whole, and Mr. James McCrummell, a colored delegate from Philadelphia, was called to the chair. President Green spoke warmly for editors who had stood erect and· exposed their bosoms to the shafts which calumny had thrown. “They have," he said, " stood out amidst falling missiles and jarring notes of opposition; and, like trumpets, lifted up their voices for the poor and needy, the suffering and the dumb." He expressed to them his gratitude, and avowed his willingness to present his own “bare bosom to the foe, and receive the shafts intended for them."

Lewis Tappan followed in warm and eloquent commendation of the services of Benjamin Lundy and William Lloyd Garrison. He wished the members of the convention by their action to show to posterity that the men contemplated in the resolution were held in high esteem. “Although they are," he said, "held accursed by those who know them not, and who seek to impeach their motives and destroy their lives; yet the coming generations shall hallow their memories and , rise up and call them blessed."

Rev. Amos A. Phelps of Massachusetts earnestly supported the resolution. He referred in words of tender eulogy to the Rev. Charles B. Storrs, late president of the Western Reserve College, who had recently died at Braintree, Massachusetts. He stated that Mr. Storrs, while lying on his death-bed, requested that a pen should be placed in his hands, that he might affix his name to a declaration of antislavery principles about to be issued. "He commenced," said Mr. Phelps, “tracing his name, and had written the first word, 'Charles,' when he discovered that two of the letters had been transposed. Letting the pen fall, and turning to his brother, standing by, he exclaimed, with an energy peculiar to him: 'I can write no more: Brother, do you finish my name. Those principles are eternal truth. They cannot be shaken. I wish to give to them my dying testimony.'" Mr. Phelps expressed the opinion that the death of President Storrs had been hastened by over-exertion in delivering an address of great vigor and power of more than two hours in length, in behalf of the slave. Mr. Storrs was a gentleman of high promise and scholarship, of Christian principle and earnest philanthropy, in whose untimely death freedom lost one of its earliest and ablest champions. The touching scene at his death-bed is one among the evidences that the antislavery struggle in this country was born of a zeal and heroic devotion to principle which finds not many parallels in the world's history.

The convention having unanimously adopted the resolution, Mr. Denison introduced a proposition recommending the youth of the country, without distinction of sex, to form auxiliary antislavery societies, which was unanimously adopted. A. resolution, introduced by Robert B. Hall, recommending that the Christian church throughout the land should observe the last Monday evening of each month in seeking the Divine aid in behalf of the slave and of the free people of color, was then unanimously adopted; as was also another resolution, introduced by Samuel J. May, pledging the members of the convention to an effort to secure from the several denominations to which they belonged solemn and earnest addresses in behalf of the oppressed to affiliated churches in the slave holding States.

Mr. Garrison introduced a resolution in which it was declared that the cause of abolition eminently deserved the countenance and support of American women; and Horace P. Wakefield of Massachusetts introduced another, hailing the establishment of ladies' antislavery societies as the harbinger of a brighter day. These resolutions were also unanimously adopted, as were others, declaring that the fountains of knowledge, like those of salvation, should be opened to every creature; that the laws against teaching colored people were cruel and impious; that the statutes and customs which withhold the Bible from the slave were inconsistent with the first principles of religious liberty ; and that the teachers of religion who failed to lift the warning voice against oppression did not declare the whole counsel of God. Kindred resolutions, breathing the spirit of liberty, justice, humanity, and Christianity, were adopted with great unanimity.

In the constitution adopted, the object of the society was declared to be the entire abolition of slavery in the United States. While admitting that each State had exclusive right to legislate in regard to its abolition, it avowed as its aim to convince the people of the slave States, by arguments addressed to their understandings and consciences, that slaveholding was a heinous crime against God, and that duty and safety required its immediate abandonment, but without expatriation. It favored the abolition of the domestic slave-trade and of slavery in the District of Columbia; and urged the duty of elevating the character and condition of the free people of color, and of giving them equality with whites in civil and religious privileges, though it discountenanced any resort to physical force for the vindication of these rights.

But the most important action of the convention was its declaration of principles. A committee of ten had been appointed on the first day of the session to prepare such a paper. That committee, with several other members, assembled at the rooms of the chairman. Those present were invited to state their views concerning the document which all deemed so important. The suggestions made revealed great unanimity of opinion. The Rev. Samuel J. May states, in his " Recollections of the Antislavery Conflict”, that Elizur Wright, Jr., gave utterance to these pregnant words:” I wish that the difference between our purpose and that of the Colonization Society should be explicitly stated. We mean to exterminate slavery from our country, with its accursed influences. The Colonizationists only wish to get rid of the slaves so soon as they become free. Their plan is unrighteous, cruel, and impracticable withal. Our plan needs but a good will and a right spirit among the white people to accomplish it."

After some time spent in this conference, Mr. Garrison, Mr. Whittier, and Mr. May were appointed a sub-committee to prepare a draft of a paper setting forth the principles, sentiments, and purposes of the new society. The sub-committee immediately repaired to Mr. Garrison's lodgings; and, after a brief consultation, he was requested to prepare it. The sub-committee met early next morning, made a few slight alterations, and submitted the draft to the whole committee at nine o'clock. Alluding to this circumstance, years after, Mr. Whittier thus happily refers to this meeting: " I recall the early gray morning when, with Samuel J. May, our colleague on the committee to prepare a declaration of sentiments for the convention, I climbed to the small ' upper chamber' of a colored friend to hear thee read the first draft of a paper which will live as long as our national history."

For hours this document was subjected to a careful and critical examination; yet but few alterations were found necessary. Mr. Garrison had arraigned the Colonization Society with characteristic severity. But his strictures were omitted, on motion of Mr. May, for the reason that the Colonization Society could not long survive the deadly blows already aimed at it; and it was not worthwhile to perpetuate its memory in this declaration of the rights of man. This omission was resisted by Mr. Garrison; but, finding the committee were favorable to it, he promptly yielded, with the remark, “Brethren, it is your report, not mine."

Edwin P. Atlee, chairman of the committee, reported the declaration to the convention. Its reading produced a profound impression. It was then moved by a member of the Society of Friends that it be adopted, and that the members proceed at once to append to it their signatures. “We have," he said,” already given it our assent; every heart here has responded to it. There is a doctrine of the Friends which impelled me to make the motion I have done. First impressions are from heaven. I fear, if we go about criticising and amending this declaration, we shall qualify its truthfulness and impair its strength." But the convention thought otherwise.  It was read paragraph by paragraph, and discussed for several hours; very few changes, however, were made. The venerable Thomas Shipley, a Quaker, and a long-tried friend of the black man, objected to the word "manstealer," as applied to the slaveholder; but it was suggested by Lucretia Mott that the term be retained, with an amendment inserting before it the words " according to Scripture," and the suggestion was adopted. The document, with this slight modification, was then unanimously adopted.

Thus far the convention had been a success. Its numbers, its character, its harmony, and its enthusiasm were animating and auspicious. But its hours of deliberation and conference were over. Agreeing among themselves, their great work was now to convince others. Framing a platform on which they could stand, they were to go forth, and, in a conservative and captious community, make proselytes who would occupy it with them. Happily blinded to the severity and the length of the contest on which they were entering, they went forth confident in the power of truth and in the favor of the Almighty.

On the morning of the third day the declaration, which had in the meantime been engrossed, was submitted for signatures; and upon it sixty-two members, representing ten States, enrolled their names. Lucretia Mott, Esther Moore, Lydia White, Sydney Ann Lewis, and several other Quaker women, of Philadelphia, were, after the first day, in constant attendance on the convention, and were deeply interested in its work. But their names were not enrolled as members, nor appended to its declaration of principles. While that declaration, however, was under consideration, Mrs. Mott, a woman of fine intellectual development, with a rare combination of firmness, gentleness, and clear moral perceptions, rose and, remarking that she was there by sufferance, said that, if permitted, she would make a suggestion. She paused for a moment, as if unwilling to offend even the prejudices of any of its members, when President Green promptly, and in a voice at once cordial and encouraging, bade her go on, while others seconded his words. She suggested several modifications, and gave the reasons why they should be made with such clearness and precision that they were readily assented to.

The declaration was a paper of great ability and power,-- the power of timely truth and of appropriate and forcible expression. Commencing with a reference to the time, fifty seven years before, when, in the same city of' Philadelphia, our fathers announced to the world their Declaration of Independence, based on the self-evident truths of human equality and rights, and appealed to arms for its defence, it spoke of the new enterprise as one " without which that of our fathers is incomplete," and as transcending theirs in magnitude, solemnity, and probable results, as much " as moral truth does physical force." It spoke of the difference of the two in the means and ends proposed, and of the trifling grievances of· our fathers, compared with the wrongs and sufferings of the slaves, which it forcibly characterized as unequalled by any others on the face of the earth. It claimed that the nation was bound to repent at once, to let the oppressed go free, and to admit them to all the rights and privileges of others, because, it asserted, no man has a right to enslave or imbrute his brother; because liberty is inalienable; because there is no difference, in principle, between slaveholding and manstealing, which the law brands as piracy; and because no length of bondage can invalidate man's claim to himself, or render slave laws anything but " an audacious usurpation."

It maintained that no compensation should be given to planters emancipating slaves, because that would be a surrender of fundamental principles; because '' slavery is a crime, and is, therefore, not an article to be sold “; because slaveholders are not just proprietors of what they claim; because emancipation would destroy only nominal, not real property; and because compensation, if given at all, should be given to the slaves.

It declared ''any scheme of expatriation” to be “delusive, cruel, and dangerous." It fully recognized the right of each State to legislate exclusively on the subject of slavery within its limits, and conceded that Congress, under the present national compact, had no right to interfere; though still contending that it had the power, and should exercise it, "to suppress the domestic slave-trade between the several States," and " to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia and in those portions of our territory which the Constitution has placed under its exclusive jurisdiction." Having thus clearly and cogently announced the principles of the enterprise thus solemnly undertaken and avowed; having guarded with scrupulous care against all infringement of the personal or constitutional rights of any person or State, it closed with the following eloquent portrayal of the obligations still admitted, the agencies to be employed, with a pledge of unswerving fidelity to the work undertaken, and an unwavering trust in the guiding hand and final blessing of God:

“We also maintain that there are, at the present time, the highest obligations resting upon the people of the free States to remove slavery by moral and political action, as prescribed m the Constitution of the United States. They are now living under a pledge of their tremendous physical force to fasten the galling fetters of tyranny upon the limbs of millions in the· Southern States ; they are liable to be called at any moment to suppress a general insurrection of the slaves ; they authorize the slave-owner to vote on three-fifths of his slaves as property, and thus enable him to perpetuate his oppression; they support a standing army at the South for its protection; and they seize the slave who has escaped into their territories, and send him back to be tortured by an enraged master or a brutal driver. This relation to slavery is criminal, and full of danger; IT MUST BE BROKEN UP.

“These are our views and principles, -these our designs and measures. With entire confidence in the overruling justice of God, we plant ourselves upon the Declaration of Independence and the truths of Divine revelation as upon the everlasting rock. .

 “We shall organize antislavery soch?ties, if possible, in every city, town, and village in our land.

“We shall send forth agents to lift up the voice of remonstrance, of warning, of entreaty and rebuke.” We shall circulate unsparingly and extensively antislavery tracts and periodicals.

“We shall enlist the pulpit and the press in the cause of the suffering and the dumb.  

"We shall aim at a purification of the churches from all participation in the guilt of slavery.

“We shall encourage the labor of freemen, rather than that of slaves, by giving ·a preference to their productions; and  

“We shall spare no exertions nor means to bring the whole nation to speedy repentance.

“Our trust for victory is solely in God. We may be personally defeated, but our principles never. TRUTH, JUSTICE; RE.A.SON, HUMANITY, must and will gloriously triumph. Already a host is coming up to the help of the Lord against the mighty, and the prospect before us is full of encouragement.

"Submitting this DECLARATION to the candid examination of the people of this country, and of the friends of Liberty throughout the world, we hereby affix our signatures to it; pledging ourselves that, under the guidance and by the help of Almighty God, we will do all that in us lies, consistently with this declaration of our principles, to overthrow the most execrable system of slavery that has ever been witnessed upon earth, to deliver our land from its deadliest curse, to wipe out the foulest stain which rests upon our national escutcheon, and to secure to the colored population of the United States all the rights and privileges which belong to them as men and as Americans, come what may to our persons, our interests, or our reputation; whether we live to witness the triumph of LIBERTY, JUSTICE, and HUMANITY, or perish untimely as martyrs in this great, benevolent, and holy cause."  

The president of the convention made a closing address. Profound silence pervaded the hall as he rapidly glanced at the great work which had been accomplished. He referred to the constitution of the new society, to its list of officers, to the signing and the sending forth to the world of its Declaration of Sentiments, to the union and earnestness which had marked the proceedings, and to the meeting of congenial minds, where heart had beat responsive to heart in the holy work of seeking to benefit the outraged and despised colored race. He closed his speech -- which for eloquence .and thrilling power will never be forgotten by those who heard it -- with these words of heroic self-sacrifice, faith, and trust:--  

"But now we must retire from these balmy influences, and breathe another atmosphere. The chill hoar-frost will be upon us. The storm and tempest will rise, and the waves of persecution will dash against our souls. Let us be prepared for the worst. Let us fasten ourselves to the throne of God as with hooks of steel. If we cling not to Him, our names to that document will be but as dust.

“Let us court no applause; indulge in no spirit of vain boasting. Let us be assured that our only hope in grappling with the bony monster is in an Arm that is stronger than ours. Let us fix our gaze on God, and walk in the light of his countenance. If our cause be just, and 1 we know it is, his omnipotence is pledged to its triumph. Let this cause be intwined around the very fibers of our hearts. Let our hearts grow to it, so that nothing but death can sunder the bond."

Having finished his address, he "immediately," to use the words of one who heard him, "lifted up his voice to the Throne of Heavenly Grace in a prayer full of fervor and zeal, imploring the forgiveness and blessing of God to descend and sanctify the convention."

Such were the origin and organization of the American Antislavery Society. Its board of officers embraced many men of marked ability, as well as of recognized position and influence. Arthur Tappan was chosen president, and gave to the new association, not only the benefit of his warm devotion to the cause, but his great practical sagacity and prestige as a leading merchant of New York.

Elizur Wright, Jr., then of the same city, was made secretary of domestic correspondence, and continued in that position till 1838. He was also a member, ex officio, of the executive committee. Its annual reports, with slight contributions from others, were from his pen, and constitute an important part of the antislavery literature of the five eventful years in which he filled the office. Mr. Wright held a bold and incisive pen, which he ever wielded in the interests of humanity. If his words were sometimes curt and caustic, they were always vigorous and effective; and if he was sometimes impulsive and impracticable, there was always an air of refreshing boldness and honesty in what he said and did.

Dr. Abraham L. Cox of New York was made recording secretary. He was earnest, industrious, impulsive, energetic; but not, like his compeers of that day, persistent and unflinching. Mr. Garrison was selected as secretary of foreign correspondence. For this post he was eminently fitted by his knowledge of antislavery leaders abroad, as also by their recognition of him as the foremost among the .Abolitionists of this country.

There were twenty-five vice-presidents. .Among them were the venerable Moses. Brown of Rhode Island, an early Abolitionist and philanthropist, whose well-directed munificence was largely bestowed upon and most honorably associated with the University of that State; General Samuel Fessenden of Maine, a distinguished lawyer and a consistent Christian statesman; and Rev. Samuel J. May, who was among the earliest to espouse the then hated cause of immediate emancipation, and who for forty years was indefatigable in his labors for freedom, devoting without faltering his talents, learning, social and ecclesiastical influence, to its advocacy and defence.

There was also a large board of managers, embracing several gentlemen who had then and who have since taken an important part in the great struggle. Perhaps none have been more distinguished for their persistent and painstaking zeal than were the brothers Arthur and Lewis Tappan, William Goodell, and Joshua Leavitt, whose generous and effective labors are more particularly referred to in another connection.

There, too, was John G. Whittier, the Quaker bard, who early consecrated his genius to the cause of humanity, when to be an Abolitionist was to lose caste in church and state, society and literature. How much he did, and how nobly and beautifully he did it, will be among the most grateful recollections of that stern strife. That he was the right man in the right place may be well conjectured from his own testimony, thirty years later, when, alluding to his signature of the "Declaration of Sentiments," he could say, though wearing the .green chaplet of poetic fame, with which two hemispheres had admiringly crowned him: "I love, perhaps too well, the praise and good-will of my fellow-men; but I set a higher value on my name as appended to the Antislavery Declaration of 1833 than on the title-page of any book. Looking over a life marked with many errors and short comings, I rejoice that I have been able to maintain the pledge of that signature, and that in the long intervening years

“ ‘ My voice, though not the loudest, has been heard Wherever Freedom raised her cry of pain.' "

Unlike most of his coadjutors of that day, he had clear conceptions of the political bearings of slavery. As editor of the '"Pennsylvania Freeman," associate editor of the “National Era,'' and a contributor to other antislavery journals, he did much to prepare the minds of the people for political action. In counsel and action always sagacious and practical, he participated in those movements which finally resulted in the organization of that powerful party which overthrew the system of human bondage and dethroned the Slave Power. In those early days, " the clarion notes from his muse," in the words of Henry B. Stanton " were like the inspired appeals of the Hebrew prophets, summoning the elect of God to do battle with the powers of darkness." All along the struggle, too, these lyrics of the meek-visaged but fiery-souled Quaker rang out their notes of warning and appeal. And even after rebellion had convulsed the land, and civil war had summoned its legions to the field, his strains were heard amid the din of strife, and the loyal soldier often felt their inspiration in the camp, on the march, and in the hour of battle.

Rev. Amos A. Phelps was another member of the board, who afterward evinced the sincerity and strength of his devotion by leaving an eligible position as pastor of a city congregation, to labor exclusively for the lowly and oppressed. A logical speaker and vigorous writer, he rendered invaluable service to the cause of emancipation in the earlier stages of its history. A volume of lectures was published by him in the year 1834, in which questions connected with slavery were elaborately discussed, and an earnest appeal was made to the clergy of all denominations. This work continued for a long time a text-book for antislavery speakers and writers. From this time onward he labored assiduously and earnestly, till the time of his premature death, which occurred in 1847. He, however, not only died without being permitted to see the harvest of the seed he had so faithfully sown, but he fell at his post in that dark hour when the nation, under the inspiration and behests of the Slave Power, was fighting ingloriously on a foreign soil to extend and perpetuate the very system he had labored so faithfully to limit and extirpate.

Theodore D. Weld, perhaps the youngest member of the board, was a descendant of Jonathan Edwards and then a member of Lane Seminary. He was one of the members who were involved in the conflict with its Faculty which then and afterward assumed so much of historic interest in the annals of the antislavery struggle. A cogent reasoner and a glowing rhetorician, he was esteemed one of the most powerful platform speakers of his day. He was the author of several remarkable productions. Among them were “The Bible View of Slavery," "Slavery as it is," and “The Power of Congress over Slavery in the District of Columbia," which exerted a marked influence over the thoughtful, pious, and humane. In 1838 and 1839 he was associated, at the office in New York, with John G. Whittier and Henry B. Stanton in securing and forwarding to Congress antislavery petitions for the abolition of slavery and the slave-trade in the District of Columbia, which so excited the ire of its Southern members.

There, too, was Benjamin Lundy, the early and ever-vigilant and faithful friend of the slave; and Isaac Knapp, a silent but efficient worker, the coadjutor of Mr. Garrison in the publication of the "Liberator." There were also Ellis Gray Loring, David Lee Child, and Samuel E. Sewall, learned and accomplished lawyers of Boston, whose early consecration of personal and professional service to the cause of abolition was followed by a life-long and consistent devotion to the interests of the slave. Mr. Loring died too early to see the glorious consummation which now gladdens the sight of many of his early coadjutors. Upon that list, too, was the name of Dr. Jacob Ide of Massachusetts, who, then in the prime of his powers hand influence, made this public commitment, from which he never afterward swerved. While too many of  his clerical brethren, at least, remained silent in the presence of this giant iniquity, his voice and commanding influence were ever true to the cause of the slave. Robert Purvis of Philadelphia, a young colored gentleman of talents and culture, was also a member. Feeling in his own person the 'wrongs of his brethren, he labored long and earnestly, with fiery zeal and fervid eloquence, to lift the heavy burden from his race.

The executive committee engaged an office in New York City, and at once entered upon the vigorous prosecution of its work. Arthur Tappan, president of the society, subscribed three thousand dollars; John Rankin, likewise a merchant of New York, subscribed twelve hundred; Lewis Tappan, one thousand; and other members and friends lesser sums, payable annually. The “Emancipator” was put upon a firmer basis, under the editorship· of William Goodell, and publications in various form were circulated with unstinted liberality. The society rapidly increased in numbers, strength, and influence. Its lecturers and agents, newspapers and occasional publication, instructed and aroused the country. Auxiliaries, adopting its principles, were rapidly organized; so that they numbered sixteen hundred and fifty, with a membership of nearly a quarter of a. million, at the time of its disruption.

Source:  Wilson, Henry, History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, Vol. 1.  Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1872.



Principal Leaders of the American Anti-Slavery Society

GARRISON, William Lloyd, 1805-1879, journalist, printer, preeminent American abolitionist leader.  Founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  President and Member of the Executive Committee, AASS, 1843-1864.  Founder, editor, Liberator, weekly newspaper founded in 1831, published through December 1865.  Corresponding Secretary, 1840-1844, Counsellor, 1844-1860, Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. 

(Drake, 1950, pp. 185, 187; Dumond, 1961, pp. 137, 167, 168, 169, 172, 173, 179, 182, 190, 273, 283, 286-287; Filler, 1960; Garrison, 1885-1889, 4 volumes; Goodell, 1852, 1852, pp. 396-397, 401, 405, 410, 419, 436, 455-456, 458-459, 460, 469, 512, 541; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Kraditor, 1969; Mabee, 1970, pp. 2, 8, 26, 28, 131, 149, 152, 376, 378, 398n15; Mayer, 1998; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 41-42, 106, 131, 152, 179, 208-209, 289, 307-309, 321, 378, 463; Sorin, 1971; Stewart, 1992; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. II, pp. 610-612; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 4, Pt. 1, p. 168; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 332-334; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 8, p. 761; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, pp. 305-306; Merrill, Walter M. Against the Wind and Tide. 1963; Thomas, John L. The Liberator: William Lloyd Garrison. 1963)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

GARRISON, William Lloyd, journalist, b. in Newburyport, Mass., 10 Dec., 1805; d. in New York city, 24 May, 1879. His father, Abijah Garrison, was a sea-captain, a man of generous nature, sanguine temperament, and good intellectual capacity, who ruined himself by intemperance. His mother, Fanny Lloyd, was a woman of exceptional beauty of person and high character, and remarkable for inflexible fidelity to her moral convictions. They emigrated from Nova Scotia to Newburyport a short time before the birth of Lloyd, and not long afterward the father left his family and was never again seen by them. At fourteen years of age Lloyd was apprenticed to the printing business in the office of the Newburyport “Herald,” where he served until he was of age, becoming foreman at an early day, and displaying a strong natural taste and capacity for editorship. From the first he was remarkable for his firmness of moral principle, his quick appreciation of ethical distinctions, and an inflexible adherence to his convictions at whatever cost to himself. His aims and purposes were of the highest, and those who knew him best foresaw for him an honorable career. His apprenticeship ended, he became editor for a time of the Newburyport “Free Press,” which he made too reformatory for the popular taste at that day. To this paper John G. Whittier, then unknown to fame, sent some of his earliest poems anonymously, but the editor, discovering his genius, penetrated his incognito, and they formed a friendship that was broken only by death. Mr. Garrison's next experiment in editorship was with the “National Philanthropist” in Boston, a journal devoted to the cause of temperance. We next hear of him in Bennington, Vt., whither he went in 1828 to conduct the “Journal of the Times,” established to support John Quincy Adams for re-election as president. Before leaving Boston, he formed an acquaintance with Benjamin Lundy, the Quaker abolitionist, then of Baltimore, where he was publishing the “Genius of Universal Emancipation,” a journal that had for its object the abolition of American slavery. Going to New England with the distinct purpose of enlisting the clergy in his cause, Lundy was bitterly disappointed by his want of success; but he mightily stirred the heart of young Garrison, who became his ally, and two years later his partner, in the conduct of the “Genius of Universal Emancipation.” This journal, up to that time, had represented the form of abolition sentiment known as gradualism, which had distinguished the anti-slavery societies of the times of Franklin and Jay, and fully answered the moral demands of the period. These societies were at this time either dead or inactive, and, since the Missouri contest of 1819-'20, the people of the north had generally ceased to strive for emancipation, or even to discuss the subject. With the exception of Lundy's earnest though feeble protest, supported mainly by Quakers, the general silence and indifference were unbroken. The whole nation had apparently come to the settled conclusion that slavery was intrenched by the constitution, and all discussion of the subject a menace to the Union. The emancipation of slaves in any considerable numbers, at any time or place, being universally regarded as dangerous to the public peace, the masters were held excusable for continuing to hold them in bondage. Mr. Garrison saw this state of things with dismay, and it became clear to him that the apathy which tended to fasten slavery permanently upon the country as an incurable evil could be broken only by heroic measures. The rights of the slaves and the duties of the masters, as measured by sound moral principles, must be unflinchingly affirmed and insisted upon. Slavery being wrong, every slave had a right to instant freedom, and therefore immediate emancipation was the duty of the masters and of the state. What was in itself right could never be dangerous to society, but must be safe for all concerned: and therefore there could be no other than selfish reasons for continuing slavery for a single day. In joining Lundy, Garrison at once took this high ground, creating thereby a strong excitement throughout the country. His denunciations of the domestic slave-trade, then rife in Baltimore, subjected him to the penalties of Maryland law, and he was thrust into jail. When released upon the payment of his fine by Arthur Tappan, of New York, he immediately resumed the work of agitation by means of popular lectures, and on 1 Jan., 1831, founded “The Liberator,” a weekly journal, in Boston, which he continued for thirty-five years, until slavery was finally abolished. It was small at first, but after a few years was enlarged to the usual size of the newspapers of that day. The spirit of the paper was indicated by this announcement in the first number: “I am aware that many object to the severity of my language, but is there not cause for severity? I will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject I do not wish to think, or speak, or write with moderation. No! no! Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm; tell him moderately to rescue his wife from the hands of the ravisher; tell the mother to gradually extricate her babe from the fire into which it has fallen; but urge me not to use moderation in a cause like the present. I am in earnest—I will not equivocate—I will not excuse—I will not retreat a single inch—and I will be heard.” It was a purely moral and pacific warfare that he avowed. No appeal was made to the passions of the slaves, but to the consciences of the masters, and especially of the citizens of the free states, involved by the constitution in the guilt of slavery. But he was charged with a design to promote slave insurrections, and held up to public scorn as a fanatic and incendiary. The state of Georgia offered $5,000 reward for his apprehension, and the mails from the south brought him hundreds of letters threatening him with death if he did not abandon his moral warfare. The whole land was speedily filled with excitement, the apathy of years was broken, and the new dispensation of immediatism justified itself by its results. In 1832 the first society under this dispensation was organized in Boston; within the next two years the American anti-slavery society was formed in Philadelphia, upon a platform of principles formulated by Mr. Garrison; and from this time the movement, in spite of powerful efforts to crush it, grew with great rapidity. Governors of states hinted that the societies were illegal, and judges affirmed that the agitators were liable to arrest as criminals under the common law. Mr. Garrison aggravated his offence, in the eyes of many, by his opposition to the scheme of African colonization, which, under the pretence of unfriendliness to slavery, had gained public confidence at the north, while in truth it fostered the idea that the slaves were unfit for freedom. His “Thoughts on African Colonization,” in which he judged the society out of its own mouth, was a most effective piece of work, defying every attempt at an answer. From 1833 till 1840 anti-slavery societies on Mr. Garrison's model were multiplied in the free states, many lecturers were sent forth, and an extensive anti-slavery literature was created. The agitation assumed proportions that greatly encouraged its promoters and alarmed its opponents. Attempts were made to suppress it by the terror of mobs; Elijah P. Lovejoy, in 1837, at Alton, Ill., was slain while defending his press, and in 1835 Garrison was dragged through the streets of Boston with a rope around his body, his life being saved with great difficulty by lodging him in jail. Marius Robinson, an anti-slavery lecturer, in Mahoning county, Ohio, was tarred and feathered in a cruel way; Amos Dresser, a theological student, while selling cottage Bibles at Nashville, Tenn., was flogged in the public square because it happened that, without his knowledge, some of his Bibles were wrapped in cast-off antislavery papers; and in Charleston, S. C., the post-office was broken open by a mob, which made a bonfire of anti-slavery papers and tracts sent through the mails to citizens of that city. In 1840 the abolition body was rent in twain, mainly by two questions, viz.: 1. Whether they should form an anti-slavery political party. 2. Whether women should be allowed to speak and vote in their societies. On the first of these questions Mr. Garrison took the negative, on the ground that such a party would probably tend to delay rather than hasten the desired action in respect to slavery. On the second he took the affirmative, on the ground that the constitutions of the societies admitted “persons” to membership without discrimination as to sex. This division was never healed, and thenceforth Mr. Garrison was recognized chiefly as the leader of the party agreeing with him upon these two questions. Personally he was a non-resistant, and therefore a non-voter; but the great body of his friends had no such scruples, and held it to be a duty to exercise the elective franchise in opposition to slavery. In 1844 Mr. Garrison became convinced that the constitution of the United States was itself the main support of slavery, and as such was to be repudiated. Borrowing the words of Isaiah, he characterized it as “a covenant with death and an agreement with hell.” His influence carried the anti-slavery societies over to this ground, which they firmly held to the end of the conflict. Few of the members had any scruples as to forceful government. They simply declared that they could not conscientiously take part in a government that bound them by oath, in certain contingencies, to support slavery. The political party anti-slavery men went their way, leaving the work of moral agitation to Garrison and his associates, who were still a powerful body, with large resources in character, argument, and influence. The two classes, though working by divergent methods, had yet a common purpose, and, though controversy between them at times waxed warm, their agreements were broad and deep enough to insure mutual respect and a no inconsiderable degree of co-operation. The political anti-slavery leaders recognized the value of the moral agitation as a means for the regeneration of public sentiment, and for keeping their own party up to its work; and the agitators bore glad witness to the sincerity of men who, though they could not see their way clear to a repudiation of the constitution, were bent upon doing all that they could under it to baffle the designs of the slave-power. Thousands of the political abolitionists made regular and liberal contributions to sustain the work of moral agitation, and the agitators rejoiced in every display of courage on the part of their voting friends, and in whatever good they could accomplish. The civil war brought the sincere opponents of slavery, of whatever class, into more fraternal relations. Mr. Garrison was quick to see that the pro-slavery Union was destroyed by the first gun fired at Sumter, and could never be restored. Thenceforth he and his associates labored to induce the government to place the war openly and avowedly on an anti-slavery basis, and to bend all its efforts to the establishment of a new Union from which slavery should be forever excluded. In this they had the co-operation of the most enlightened and earnest leaders and members of the Republican party, and on 1 Jan., 1863, their united labors were crowned with success. President Lincoln's proclamation of freedom to the slaves was a complete vindication of the doctrine of immediate emancipation; while the conditions of reconstruction gave the country a new constitution and a new Union, so far as slavery was concerned. When the contest was over, the leaders of the Republican party united with Mr. Garrison's immediate associates in raising for him the sum of $30,000, as a token of their grateful appreciation of his long and faithful service; and after his death the city of Boston accepted and erected a bronze statue to his memory. During the struggle in which he took so prominent a part he made two visits to England, where he was received with many marks of distinction by the abolitionists of that country, as the acknowledged founder of the anti-slavery movement in the United States. The popular estimate of his character and career is doubtless expressed in the words of John A. Andrew, war-governor of Massachusetts: “The generation which immediately preceded ours regarded him only as a wild enthusiast, a fanatic, or a public enemy. The present generation sees in him the bold and honest reformer, the man of original, self-poised, heroic will, inspired by a vision of universal justice, made actual in the practice of nations; who, daring to attack without reserve the worst and most powerful oppression of his country and his time, has outlived the giant wrong he assailed, and has triumphed over the sophistries by which it was maintained.” Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. II, pp. 610-612.

 

WELD, Theodore Dwight, 1803-1895, Cincinnati, Ohio, New York, NY, reformer, abolitionist leader, anti-slavery lobbyist.  Co-founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS) in December 1833.  Manager, 1833-1835, and Corresponding Secretary, 1839-1840, of the Society.  Published American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses (1839).  Also wrote The Bible Against Slavery (1839) and Slavery and the Internal Slave Trace in the United States (London, 1841).  Married to abolitionist Angelina Grimké.  (Barnes, 1933; Drake, 1950, pp. 138, 140, 158, 173; Dumond, 1961, pp. 161, 176, 180, 183, 185, 220, 240-241; Filler, 1960, pp. 32, 56, 67, 72, 102, 148, 156, 164, 172, 176, 206; Hammond, 2011, pp. 268, 273; Mabee, 1970, pp. 17, 33, 34, 38, 92, 93, 104, 146, 151, 152, 153, 187, 188, 191, 196, 348, 358; Pease, 1965, pp. 94-102; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 46, 106, 321-323, 419, 486, 510-512; Sorin, 1971, pp. 42-43, 53, 60, 64, 67, 70n; Thomas, 1950; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, p. 425; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 10, Pt. 1, p. 625; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 681-682; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 22, p. 928; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 318; Hinks, Peter P., & John R. McKivigan, Eds., Encyclopedia of Antislavery and Abolition.  Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood, 2007, Vol. 2, pp. 740-741; Abzug, Robert H. Passionare Liberator: Theodore Dwight Weld and the Dilemma of Reform, New York, 1980; Dumond, Dwight L., ed., Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimké Weld and Sarah Grimké, 1822-144, 1965)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

WELD, Theodore Dwight, reformer, b. in Hampton, Conn., 23 Nov., 1803. He entered Phillips Andover academy in 1819, but was not graduated, on account of failing eyesight. In 1830 he became general agent of the Society for the promotion of manual labor in literary institutions, publishing afterward a valuable report (New York, 1833). He entered Lane theological seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1833, but left that institution on the suppression of the Anti-slavery society of the seminary by the trustees. Mr. Weld then became well known as an anti-slavery lecturer, but in 1836 he lost his voice, and was appointed by the American anti-slavery society editor of its books and pamphlets. In 1841-'3 he labored in Washington in aid of the anti-slavery members of congress, and in 1854 he established at Eagleswood, N. J., a school in which he received pupils irrespective of sex and color. In 1864 he removed to Hyde Park, near Boston, and devoted himself to teaching and lecturing. Mr. Weld is the author of many pamphlets, and of “The Power of Congress over the District of Columbia” (New York, 1837); “The Bible against Slavery” (1837); “American Slavery as it Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses” (1839); and “Slavery and the Internal Slave Trade in the United States” (London, 1841). Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI. pp. 425.

 

TAPPAN, Lewis Northey, 1788-1873, New York, NY, merchant, radical abolitionist leader.  Co-founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Member of the Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1855, Treasurer, 1840-1842, Secretary, 1842-1844, Corresponding Secretary, 1845-1846, 1848-1855.  Leader of the Philadelphia Free Produce Association.  Wrote Life. (Blue, 2005; Burin, 2005, p. 89; Dumond, 1961, pp. 159, 218, 287; Filler, 1960, pp. 26, 31, 50, 55, 61, 63, 68, 72, 94, 102, 130, 136, 138, 144, 150, 152, 158, 164, 165, 168, 174, 177, 189, 194, 210, 247, 262; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970, pp. 8, 9, 13-19, 21, 24, 26, 38, 42-49, 51, 55, 58, 91, 93, 104, 105, 130, 190, 151-156, 190, 202, 219-221, 226-229, 233, 234, 251-253, 257, 334, 340, 341, 343, 344, 345; Mitchell, 2007; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 106, 161, 162, 163, 166, 174, 290, 362; Sorin, 1971, pp. 70, 93, 96, 102, 113, 114, 131; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, pp. 32-34; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 2, p. 203; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 21, p. 311; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 321; Tappan, Lewis. Life of Arthur Tappan. New York, Hurd and Houghton: 1870; Hinks, Peter P., & John R. McKivigan, Eds., Encyclopedia of Antislavery and Abolition.  Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood, 2007, Vol. 2, pp. 673-675; Wyatt-Brown, Bertram, Lewis Tappan and the Evangelical War against Slavery, 1969; Staudenraus, P. J. The African Colonization Movement, 1816-1865. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961, pp. 76, 128-129, 219, 228, 230)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

TAPPAN, Lewis, merchant, b. in Northampton, Mass., 23 May, 1788; d. in Brooklyn, N. Y., 21 June, 1873, received a good education, and at the age of sixteen became clerk in a dry-goods house in Boston. His employers subsequently aided him in establishing himself in business, and he became interested in calico-print works and in the manufacture of cotton. In 1827 he removed to New York and became a member of the firm of Arthur Tappan and Co., and his subsequent career was closely identified with that of his brother Arthur. With the latter he established in 1828 the “Journal of Commerce,” of which he became sole owner in 1829. In 1833 he entered with vigor into the anti-slavery movement, in consequence of which his house was sacked and his furniture was destroyed by a mob in July, 1834, and at other times he and his brother suffered personal violence. He was also involved in the crisis of 1837, and afterward withdrew from the firm and established the first mercantile agency in the country, which he conducted with success. He was chief founder of the American missionary association, of which he was treasurer and afterward president, and was an early member of Plymouth church, Brooklyn. He published the life of his brother mentioned above, but afterward joined in the free-soil movement at its inception. He was widely known for his drollery and wit and for his anti-slavery sentiments. Judge Tappan published “Cases decided in the Court of Common Pleas,” with an appendix (Steubenville, 1831). Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, pp. 32-34.





Officers and Representatives of the American Anti-Slavery Society


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Aaron, Samuel, 1800-1865, Morristown, NJ, educator, clergyman, temperance activist, abolitionist.  Manager, American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), 1840-1842.  Vice President, 1839-1840, Executive Committee, American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. 

(Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I, p. 1.  Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

AARON, Samuel, educator, b. in New Britain, Bucks co., Pa., in 1800; d. in Mount Holly, N. J., 11 April, 1865. He was left an orphan at six years of age, and became the ward of an uncle, upon whose farm he worked for several years, attending school only in winter. A small legacy inherited from his father enabled him at the age of sixteen to enter the Doylestown, Pa., academy, where he fitted himself to become a teacher, and at the age of twenty was engaged as an assistant instructor in the classical and mathematical school in Burlington, N. J. Here he studied and taught, and soon opened an independent day school at Bridge Point, but was presently invited to become principal of Doylestown academy. In 1829 he was ordained, and became pastor of a Baptist church in New Britain. In 1833 he took charge of the Burlington high school, serving at the same time as pastor of the Baptist church in that city. Accepting in 1841 an invitation from a church in Norristown, Pa., he remained there three years, when he opened the Treemount seminary near Norristown, which under his management soon became prosperous, and won a high reputation for the thoroughness of its training and discipline. The financial disasters of 1857 found Mr. Aaron with his name pledged as security for a friend, and he was obliged to sacrifice all his property to the creditors. He was soon offered the head-mastership of Mt. Holly, N. J., institute, a large, well-established school for boys, where, in company with his son as joint principal, he spent the remainder of his life. During these years he was pastor of a church in Mt. Holly. He prepared a valuable series of text-books introducing certain improvements in methods of instruction, which added greatly to his reputation as an educator. His only publication in book form, aside from his text-books, was entitled “Faithful Translation” (Philadelphia, 1842). He was among the early advocates of temperance, and was an earnest supporter of the anti-slavery cause from its beginning. Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I. pp. 1.

 

Adair, William A., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1837-40, State Delegate, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Adam, William, Cambridge, Massachusetts, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1843-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Adams, E. M., New York, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1836-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Adams, William, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1837-40, 1840-42, Delegate, Pawtucket Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Aikman, Robert, New York, New York, abolitionist, Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840)

 

Aikman, Robert, Jr., New York, New York, abolitionist, Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840)

 

Aldis, Asa, St. Albans, Vermont, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Allen, Abram, Clinton C., Ohio, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1843-52. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Allen, George, Shrewsbury, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Allen, William, Buffalo, New York, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS).

 

Allen, William G., b. 1820, free African American abolitionist, publisher and editor. Manager and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society in December 1833.  Publisher with Henry Highland Garnet of The National Watchman, Troy, New York, founded 1842.

(Filler, 1960, pp. 142, 249, 261; Mabee, 1970, pp. 107, 109; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 48; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 1, p. 346; Gates, Henry Louis, Jr., & Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, eds. African American National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2013, Vol. 1, p. 127; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Allen, William T., Huntsville, Alabama, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Alsop, George M., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Alvord, D. W., Greenfield, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Andrews, Samuel C., Ohio, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Vice-President, 1838-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Angell, Stephan, New York, New York, abolitionist, Annual Meeting, 1839, 1840. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839, 1849)

 

Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820-1906, Agent, American Anti-Slavery Society, reformer, abolitionist, orator, leader of the female suffrage movement, radical egalitarian, temperance movement leader, founded Women’s National Loyal League with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1863 to fight for cause of abolition, co-founded American Equal Rights Association (AERA) in 1866 to fight for universal suffrage. 

(Anthony, 1954; Barry, 1988; Harper, 1899; Harper, 1998; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 169-170, 291, 465, 519; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I, p. 82; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 1, Pt. 1, pp. 318-321; Harper, Ida Husted, 1899, The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony; Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, 1885, Our Famous Women; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

ANTHONY, Susan Brownell, reformer, b. in South Adams, Mass., 15 Feb., 1820. Daniel Anthony, her father, a cotton manufacturer, was a liberal Quaker, who educated his daughters with the idea of self-support, and employed skilful teachers in his own house. After completing her education at a Friends' boarding-school in Philadelphia, she taught in New York state from 1835 to 1850. Her father removed in 1826 to Washington co., N. Y., and in 1846 settled at Rochester. Miss Anthony first spoke in public in 1847, and from that time took part in the temperance movement, organizing societies and lecturing. In 1851 she called a temperance convention in Albany, after being refused admission to a previous convention on account of her sex. In 1852 the Woman's New York State Temperance Society was organized. Through her exertions, and those of Mrs. E. C. Stanton, women came to be admitted to educational and other conventions with the right to speak, vote, and serve on committees. About 1857 she became prominent among the agitators for the abolition of slavery. In 1858 she made a report, in a teachers' convention at Troy, in favor of the co-education of the sexes. Her energies have been chiefly directed to securing equal civil rights for women. In 1854-'55 she held conventions in each county of New York in the cause of female suffrage, and since then she has addressed annual appeals and petitions to the legislature. She was active in securing the passage of the act of the New York legislature of 1860, giving to married women the possession of their earnings, the guardianship of their children, etc. During the war she devoted herself to the women's loyal league, which petitioned congress in favor of the 13th amendment. In 1860 she started a petition in favor of leaving out the word “male” in the 14th amendment, and worked with the national woman suffrage association to induce congress to secure to her sex, the right of voting. In 1867 she went to Kansas with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucy Stone, and there obtained 9,000 votes in favor of woman suffrage. In 1868, with the cooperation of Mrs. Stanton and Parker Pillsbury, and with the assistance of George F. Train, she began, in New York city, the publication of a weekly paper called “The Revolutionist,” devoted to the emancipation of women. In 1872 Miss Anthony cast ballots at the state and congressional election in Rochester, in order to test the application of the 14th and 15th amendments of the U. S. constitution. She was indicted for illegal voting, and was fined by Justice Hunt, but, in accordance with her defiant declaration, never paid the penalty. Between 1870 and 1880 she lectured in all the northern and several of the southern states more than one hundred times a year. In 1881 she wrote, with the assistance of her co-editors, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Matilda Joslyn Gage, “The History of Woman Suffrage” in two volumes. Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I. pp. 82.

 

Aplin, William, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1840-1842. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Appleton, James, Portland, Maine, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Arnold, B., Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Arthur, William, Williston, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ash, George W., Amhurst, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ashby, William, Newburyport, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Atkinson, George, Mullica Hills, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1848-52, Vice-President, 1850-54. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Atkinson, John, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1842-48. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Atlee, Edwin P., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-36, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Averill, James, Yale College, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)



Bagley, C. F., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bailey, Kiah, Hardwich, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Baker, John J., Beverly, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Baldwin, J. G., Middletown, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1835, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1835, 1839)

 

Ball, E. T., Cincinnatus, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Ballard, James, Bennington, Vermont, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ballemore, J. H., Troy, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bancroft, William W., Granville, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Barbadoes, James G., (free Black), b. 1810, Boston, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-35, 1835-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Barber, Edward, Middlebury, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Barber, Edward D., Middlebury, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Barbour, James G., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Barker, J. M., Clinton County, New York, abolitionist, Clinton County Society of the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1833)

 

Barker, Joseph, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1852-56. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Barnaby, James W., Harwich, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Barnes, Henry, Montpellier, Vermont, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Barnet, Milton, Morrisville, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Barney, Eliza, Nantucket, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Barney, Hiram, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Bartlett, Dudley, Whitesboro, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bartlett, Luther, Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Barton, Isaac, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Bascom, Elisha, Shoreham, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Basett, William, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bassett, Benjamin P., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bassett, D. C., Albany, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Bassett, William, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bates, Merrit, Swanton, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Beach, Augustus, Oppenheim, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Beebe, Thomas, Whitesboro, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Beckley, G., Vermont, abolitionist, Agent, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Beckworth, Amos, Middletown, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Beecher, Edward, Jacksonville, Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Beekey, John P., Schenectady, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Beers, Lewis, Jr., Stratford, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Bell, Christopher, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Representative from New Hampshire. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bell, Phillipa, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Beman, Jehiel C., Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Benedict, Seth W., New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bennett, Asa, Homer, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Benson, Edmund L., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1842-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Benson, George, Brooklyn, Connecticut, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Benson, George W., Providence, Rhode Island, Manager, 1833-40, Brooklyn, Connecticut, Manager, 1837-40, 1841-42, Massachusetts, Manager, 1843-51, Kansas, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1862-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Benton, Andrew, St. Louis, Missouri, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Birchard, Matthew W., Vermont, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Birge, Luther, Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Birney, James G., Kentucky, Cincinnati, Ohio, New York, New York, abolitionist, lawyer, publisher of The Philanthropist, former slaveholder, Manager, 1835-36, Vice-President, 1835-36, 1836-38, Executive Committee, 1838-40, Corresponding Secretary, 1838-40

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 176-182; Harrold, 1995, pp. 20, 23-24, 28-31, 39-40, 56, 165, 179-180; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 51, 52, 65, 70n, 103n; Van Broeken, 2002; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Blain, John, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Blaisdell, James J., Lebanon, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Blaisdell, Timothy K., Haverhill, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-39, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bleeker, Leonard, New York, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bloss, William C., Rochester, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bolles, William, New London, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, 1843-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Borden, Nathaniel B., Fall River, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, Executive Committee, 1842-43. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bourne, George, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-39. (Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bowditch, William I., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1852-56, Treasurer, 1862-64, Executive Committee, 1863-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bowen, Henry, agent (Sernett, 2002, p. 43)

 

Bown, Benjamin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Cincinnati, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42, 1843-53, Vice-President, 1860-63. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Boyle, James, Rome, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1842-43. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brainerd, Lawrence, St. Albans, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bramhall, Cornelius, New York, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1856-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brewster, Henry, LeRoy, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brockett, Zenas, Manhein, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1852-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brooke, Abraham, Oakland, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1843-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brown, A. B., LaPoret County, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brown, David P., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brown, James C., Putnam, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brown, John E. Greenwich, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brown, Moses, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brown, Samuel F., Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Brown, Stephen W., Canaan, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bruce, Robert, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Buchanan, James M., Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Buffum, Arnold, Massachusetts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, 1835-37, Vice-President, 1834-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Buffum, James M., Lynn, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1845-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Buffum, William, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, Executive Committee, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Burgess, Daniel, Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Burleigh, Charles C., Boston, Massachusetts, Vermont, abolitionist, Corresponding Secretary, 1840-43, 1859-64, Manager, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Burleigh, William H., Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bush, Obadiah Newcomb, 1797-1851, New York, educator, businessman, abolitionist.  Vice president of the American Anti-Slavery Society.  Member of the Underground Railroad.  Brother of Henry Bush. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Bush, Oren N., Rochester, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Butler, J., Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Buzby, Samuel, Delaware, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Cady, Josiah, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, Vice-President, 1837-38. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cambell, Amos, Acworth, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Camp, David M., Swanton, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Campbell, Alfred G., Trenton, New Jersey, Paterson, New Jersey, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1849-50, 1854-64, Manager, 1852-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Campbell, Amos, 1833-1837, Ackworth, New Hampshire, abolitionist.  Manager and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833. (Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Campbell, David, Andover, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Canfield, J. A., Andover, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Capron, Effingham L., Uxbridge, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Carey, George, Cincinnati, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Carmichael, Daniel, Brooklyn, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1843-44, 1845-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Carpenter, Esther, New Rochelle, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Cassey, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Caughey, John, Newburgh, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society,1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Cavender, Thomas S., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Chace, Elizabeth B., Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1851-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Chandler, Thomas, Adrian, Michigan, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Channing, William H., New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1844-49. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Chaplin, William L., Farmington, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Chapman, Henry G., Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Chapman, Maria W., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1840-41, 1844-63, Corresponding Secretary, 1843-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Chapman, W. R., Andover, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Chase, C. C., Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Chase, Harvey, Fall River, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Chase, J. B., Lynn, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Lynn Massachusetts Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Chase, Mary E., Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Chase, William M., abolitionist, Delegate, Providence Anti-Slavery Society, 1834, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834, 1838)

 

Cheever, George B., Salem, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cheever, H. T., Bangor, Maine, abolitionist, clergyman, Bangor Theological Seminary, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Chester, E. W., New York, New York, abolitionist, Annual Meeting, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Child, David Lee, 1794-1874, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, author, journalist.  Leader, manager, 1833-1840, and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Child served as a manager and a member of the Executive Committee of the AASS, 1840-1843, Vice-President, Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, 1835-1836.  Published The Despotism of Freedom—or The Tyranny and Cruelty of American Republican Slaveholders.  Co-editor with his wife, Lydia, of The Anti-Slavery Standard

(Dumond, 1961, p. 269; Mabee, 1970, pp. 193, 327; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 398, 399; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I, pp. 603-604; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 2, Pt. 2, p. 65; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 165-166; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 4, p. 804; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 324; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

CHILD, David Lee, journalist, b. in West Boylston, Mass., 8 July, 1794; d. in Wayland, Mass., 18 Sept., 1874. He was graduated at Harvard in 1817, and was for some time sub-master of the Boston Latin-school. He was secretary of legation in Lisbon about 1820, and subsequently fought in Spain, “defending what he considered the cause of freedom against her French invaders.” Returning to this country in 1824, he began in 1825 to study law with his uncle, Tyler Bigelow, in Watertown, Mass., and was admitted to the bar. He went to Belgium in 1836 to study the beet-sugar industry, and afterward received a silver medal for the first manufacture of the sugar in this country. He edited the “Massachusetts Journal,” about 1830, and while a member of the legislature denounced the annexation of Texas, afterward publishing a pamphlet on the subject, entitled “Naboth's Vineyard.” He was an early member of the anti-slavery society, and in 1832 addressed a series of letters on slavery and the slave-trade to Edward S. Abdy, an English philanthropist. He also published ten articles on the same subject (Philadelphia, 1836). During a visit to Paris in 1837 he addressed an elaborate memoir to the Société pour l'abolition d'esclavage, and sent a paper on the same subject to the editor of the “Eclectic Review” in London. John Quincy Adams was much indebted to Mr. Child's facts and arguments in the speeches that he delivered in congress on the Texan question. With his wife he edited the “Anti-Slavery Standard” in New York in 1843-'44. He was distinguished for the independence of his character, and the boldness with which he denounced social wrongs and abuses. Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I. pp. 603-604.

 

Child, Lydia M., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1840-41, Recording Secretary, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Chitchester, D., Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Church, Jefferson, Springfield, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1851-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Claflin, Jehiel C., W. Brookfield, Vermont, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1855-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Clark, John G., S. Kingston, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Clarke, Augustine, Danville, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Clarke, Edward P., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Clarke, George L., Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Clarke, J. P., Poughkeepsie, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Clarke, Peleg C., Coventry, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1838-40, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cleveland, John P., Detroit, Michigan, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Coates, Edwin H., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Coates, Lindley, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manger, 1833-40, 1840-43. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Coffin, Joshua, Tyngsborough, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Coffin, Levi, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cogswell, Daniel, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Colby, Isaac, Cincinnati, Ohio, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Cole, Thomas, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Collins, Amos M., Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Collins, J. A., Andover, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Collins, Simon, Westfield, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Colver, Nathaniel, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Comings, Benjamin, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1847-48, Vice-President, 1848-54. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Condit, Swain A., Boonton, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Cone, C., Brunswick, Maine, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Conger, Ellison, Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1848-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cook, James, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Coolidge, William T., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Cooper, Griffith M., Williamson, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1852-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Copeland, D., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Copeland, Melvin, Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Corliss, Hiram, Washington County, New York, abolitionist, Washington County Abolition Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Cornish, Samuel E., abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cowdrey, Harris, Aelon, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Cowles, Henry, 1803-1881, Austinburgh, Ohio, clergyman, educator, anti-slavery activist, reformer.  Manager, 1834-1836, and founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833. (Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I, p. 757; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

COWLES, Henry, clergyman, b. in Norfolk, Conn., 24 April, 1803; d. 6 Sept., 1881. He was graduated at Yale in 1826, and held Congregational pastorates from 1828 till 1835. He was a professor of theology at Oberlin from 1835 till 1848. He published “Notes” on the Bible (16 vols., New York, 1867-'81); “Hebrew History” (New York, 1873); and other works. Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. I. pp. 757.

 

Cowles, Horace, Farmington, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-40, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cox, A., Cleaveland, New York, abolitionist, New York State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Cox, Abraham, New York, New York, abolitionist, Rec. Secretary, 1833-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cox, Samuel H., New York, New York, abolitionist, Corresponding Secretary, 1834-35, Executive Committee, 1834-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cragin, George, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Crandall, Phineas, Fall River, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-36, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Crawford, James C., Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Cromwell, John, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Cross, John, Camden, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Cross, M., abolitionist. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Crothers, Samuel, Greenfield, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Crothers, Samuel, 1783-1856, clergyman

 

Crowell, J. B., Camptown, New Jersey, abolitionist. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Crummel, Alexander, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Curry, B. B., Oswego, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Curtis, Asa, Stratford, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Curtis, Silas, Nashua, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Cushing, Henry, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cushman, John P., Troy, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Cutler, Calvin, Windham, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35, Manager, 1835-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Dana, William, Centerville, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Darling, S.D., Gilmanton, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Davidson, Sumner, Cuba, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Davis, Asa, Washington County, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1852-54. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Davis C., New York, abolitionist, New York State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Davis, Charles, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Davis, Edward M., Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1842-44, Vice-President, 1848-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Davis, Elnathan, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-47. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Davis, Gustavus F., Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Davis, Guy, Chittenengo, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Davis, Patten, W. Randolph, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1848-64, Vice President, 1849-55. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Davis, Thomas, N. Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate, 1838, Manager, 1848-52. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Davison, Henry W., New York, New York State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Day, Horace, Connecticut, abolitionist, Yale College Theological Society, Delegate from Connecticut, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dean, James E., New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Delevan, Edward C., Ballston Center, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Deming, Lucy, New York, abolitionist, New York State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Deming, Samuel, Farmington, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Denison, Charles W., New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, 1839-40, Delaware, Manager, 1837-39, editor of Emancipator (Dumond, 1961, p. 180; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dennet, Oliver, Portland, Michigan, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-45, Vice-President, 1845-51. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dennison, W.C., Hubbarton, Vermont, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Diamond, Isaac M., New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dickenson, Dexter, Boston, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Dickey, James H., Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dickinson, James T., Durham, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dickson, John, W. Bloomfield, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dodge, William B., Salem, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dole, Ebenezer, Hallowell, Maine, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dole, Ebenezer Jr., Maine, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Dole, S. F., Middletown, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Donald, Samuel, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Donaldson, Thomas, Clermont County, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1846-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Donaldson, William, Cincinnati, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Doolitte, Adrastus, New York, New York abolitionist, New York State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Dorr, William S., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Doten, David, Sumner, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dougherty, Alexander M., Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dougherty, Alexander N., Newark, New Jersey, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Dougherty, James, Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Doughty, George, Jamaica, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Douglass, Frederick, Rochester, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1848-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Douglass, R. S., Greenfield, Ohio, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838 (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Dowling, John, Newport, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dowling, Thomas, Catskill, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Downing, George T., New York, New York abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Downing, Thomas, New York, New York abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Dresser, A. A., Oberlin, Ohio, abolitionist, Oberlin Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Drury, Asa, Granville, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Duffield, George, Detroit, Michigan, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Dugdale, Joseph A., Farmington, Ohio, Selma Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1841-43, Manager, 1843-51. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Dunbar, Duncan, New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1837-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)



Eames, James H., Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1836-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Earle, Thomas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Eastman, John, New York, abolitionist, New York State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Elder, William, Courtland, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Elles, Oliver J., W. Cornwall, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37, 1837-39, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ellis, William H., New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Emery, S.H., Tauton, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Ernest, Sarah O., Cincinnati, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1857-60. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Esten, George W., Boonton, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Evans, Andrew, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1852-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Everard, Andrew, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1850-52. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Fairbanks, Asa, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1846-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Fairman, Charles, Newton, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Farmer, John, Concord, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Farnsworth, Amos, Groton, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, 1840-42, 1843-53, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Farnsworth, Benjamin, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Farnsworth, Henry A., Groton, Connecticut, abolitionist State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Ferris, Benjamin, Wilmington, Delaware, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ferris, Zeba, Delaware, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Fessenden, Samuel, Portland, Maine, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-39, Manager, 1839-40, Vice-President, 1840-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Field, Issac, Iowa Territory, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Field, Nathaniel, Jeffersonville, Indiana, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1835-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Finney, Charles G., Oberlin, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Finney, George W., West Bloomfield, New Jersey, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Fish, Benjamin, Rochester, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Fisher, Milton M., Franklin, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Fisk, Lydia M., Oberlin, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Fitch, Eleazer T., New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Fitts, Bucklin, Holliston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Fletcher, Leonard, Chester County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Folger, Robert H., Massillon, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Follen, Charles, Cambridge, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, 1836-37, Executive Committee, 1837-38. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Follen, Charles C., Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1860-63. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Follen, Eliza L., Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1846-60. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Forten, James, Jr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Forten, James, Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, Manager, 1835-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Foster, Newall A., Portland, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1845-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Foster, Stephen S., Canterbury, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Freebody, Charles T., Waterloo, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Freeman, A., abolitionist. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

French, James H., New York City, abolitionist, Annual Meeting, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

French, Rodney, New Bedford, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Frost, Daniel, Jr., New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Frost, Henry, Poughkeepsie, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Frost, John, Whitesborough, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Frye, Mary C., Salem, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Fuller, Aaron, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Fuller, Cyrus, Plymouth, Michigan, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1854-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Fuller, James C., Skeneateles, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, Vice-President, 1841-44, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Fuller, John E., Massachusetts, abolitionist, Mass State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Furnam, Philip, Schenectady, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

Fussell, Bartholomew, Kennet, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Fussell, Edwin, Pendleton, Indiana, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1842-44, 1844-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Galbraith, David L., New Garden, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gale, George W., Galesburgh, Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Galusha, Elon, Perry, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gardiner, Charles W., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Gardiner, J. H., Troy, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Gardiner, Johnson, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Gardner, William F., Union, New Jersey, Union Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839)

 

Garnet, Henry Highland, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Garretson, Jesse, New Lisbon, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-44, Vice-President, 1844-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Garrett, Thomas, Wilmington, Delaware, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1843-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Garrigues, William A., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879, journalist, printer, preeminent American abolitionist leader.  Founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  President and Member of the Executive Committee, AASS, 1843-1864.  Founder, editor, Liberator, weekly newspaper founded in 1831, published through December 1865.  Corresponding Secretary, 1840-1844, Counsellor, 844-1860, Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. 

(Drake, 1950, pp. 185, 187; Dumond, 1961, pp. 137, 167, 168, 169, 172, 173, 179, 182, 190, 273, 283, 286-287; Filler, 1960; Garrison, 1885-1889, 4 volumes; Goodell, 1852, 1852, pp. 396-397, 401, 405, 410, 419, 436, 455-456, 458-459, 460, 469, 512, 541; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Kraditor, 1969; Mabee, 1970, pp. 2, 8, 26, 28, 131, 149, 152, 376, 378, 398n15; Mayer, 1998; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 41-42, 106, 131, 152, 179, 208-209, 289, 307-309, 321, 378, 463; Sorin, 1971; Stewart, 1992; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. II, pp. 610-612; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 4, Pt. 1, p. 168; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 332-334; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 8, p. 761; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, pp. 305-306; Merrill, Walter M. Against the Wind and Tide. 1963; Thomas, John L. The Liberator: William Lloyd Garrison. 1963; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

GARRISON, William Lloyd, journalist, b. in Newburyport, Mass., 10 Dec., 1805; d. in New York city, 24 May, 1879. His father, Abijah Garrison, was a sea-captain, a man of generous nature, sanguine temperament, and good intellectual capacity, who ruined himself by intemperance. His mother, Fanny Lloyd, was a woman of exceptional beauty of person and high character, and remarkable for inflexible fidelity to her moral convictions. They emigrated from Nova Scotia to Newburyport a short time before the birth of Lloyd, and not long afterward the father left his family and was never again seen by them. At fourteen years of age Lloyd was apprenticed to the printing business in the office of the Newburyport “Herald,” where he served until he was of age, becoming foreman at an early day, and displaying a strong natural taste and capacity for editorship. From the first he was remarkable for his firmness of moral principle, his quick appreciation of ethical distinctions, and an inflexible adherence to his convictions at whatever cost to himself. His aims and purposes were of the highest, and those who knew him best foresaw for him an honorable career. His apprenticeship ended, he became editor for a time of the Newburyport “Free Press,” which he made too reformatory for the popular taste at that day. To this paper John G. Whittier, then unknown to fame, sent some of his earliest poems anonymously, but the editor, discovering his genius, penetrated his incognito, and they formed a friendship that was broken only by death. Mr. Garrison's next experiment in editorship was with the “National Philanthropist” in Boston, a journal devoted to the cause of temperance. We next hear of him in Bennington, Vt., whither he went in 1828 to conduct the “Journal of the Times,” established to support John Quincy Adams for re-election as president. Before leaving Boston, he formed an acquaintance with Benjamin Lundy, the Quaker abolitionist, then of Baltimore, where he was publishing the “Genius of Universal Emancipation,” a journal that had for its object the abolition of American slavery. Going to New England with the distinct purpose of enlisting the clergy in his cause, Lundy was bitterly disappointed by his want of success; but he mightily stirred the heart of young Garrison, who became his ally, and two years later his partner, in the conduct of the “Genius of Universal Emancipation.” This journal, up to that time, had represented the form of abolition sentiment known as gradualism, which had distinguished the anti-slavery societies of the times of Franklin and Jay, and fully answered the moral demands of the period. These societies were at this time either dead or inactive, and, since the Missouri contest of 1819-'20, the people of the north had generally ceased to strive for emancipation, or even to discuss the subject. With the exception of Lundy's earnest though feeble protest, supported mainly by Quakers, the general silence and indifference were unbroken. The whole nation had apparently come to the settled conclusion that slavery was intrenched by the constitution, and all discussion of the subject a menace to the Union. The emancipation of slaves in any considerable numbers, at any time or place, being universally regarded as dangerous to the public peace, the masters were held excusable for continuing to hold them in bondage. Mr. Garrison saw this state of things with dismay, and it became clear to him that the apathy which tended to fasten slavery permanently upon the country as an incurable evil could be broken only by heroic measures. The rights of the slaves and the duties of the masters, as measured by sound moral principles, must be unflinchingly affirmed and insisted upon. Slavery being wrong, every slave had a right to instant freedom, and therefore immediate emancipation was the duty of the masters and of the state. What was in itself right could never be dangerous to society, but must be safe for all concerned: and therefore there could be no other than selfish reasons for continuing slavery for a single day. In joining Lundy, Garrison at once took this high ground, creating thereby a strong excitement throughout the country. His denunciations of the domestic slave-trade, then rife in Baltimore, subjected him to the penalties of Maryland law, and he was thrust into jail. When released upon the payment of his fine by Arthur Tappan, of New York, he immediately resumed the work of agitation by means of popular lectures, and on 1 Jan., 1831, founded “The Liberator,” a weekly journal, in Boston, which he continued for thirty-five years, until slavery was finally abolished. It was small at first, but after a few years was enlarged to the usual size of the newspapers of that day. The spirit of the paper was indicated by this announcement in the first number: “I am aware that many object to the severity of my language, but is there not cause for severity? I will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject I do not wish to think, or speak, or write with moderation. No! no! Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm; tell him moderately to rescue his wife from the hands of the ravisher; tell the mother to gradually extricate her babe from the fire into which it has fallen; but urge me not to use moderation in a cause like the present. I am in earnest—I will not equivocate—I will not excuse—I will not retreat a single inch—and I will be heard.” It was a purely moral and pacific warfare that he avowed. No appeal was made to the passions of the slaves, but to the consciences of the masters, and especially of the citizens of the free states, involved by the constitution in the guilt of slavery. But he was charged with a design to promote slave insurrections, and held up to public scorn as a fanatic and incendiary. The state of Georgia offered $5,000 reward for his apprehension, and the mails from the south brought him hundreds of letters threatening him with death if he did not abandon his moral warfare. The whole land was speedily filled with excitement, the apathy of years was broken, and the new dispensation of immediatism justified itself by its results. In 1832 the first society under this dispensation was organized in Boston; within the next two years the American anti-slavery society was formed in Philadelphia, upon a platform of principles formulated by Mr. Garrison; and from this time the movement, in spite of powerful efforts to crush it, grew with great rapidity. Governors of states hinted that the societies were illegal, and judges affirmed that the agitators were liable to arrest as criminals under the common law. Mr. Garrison aggravated his offence, in the eyes of many, by his opposition to the scheme of African colonization, which, under the pretence of unfriendliness to slavery, had gained public confidence at the north, while in truth it fostered the idea that the slaves were unfit for freedom. His “Thoughts on African Colonization,” in which he judged the society out of its own mouth, was a most effective piece of work, defying every attempt at an answer. From 1833 till 1840 anti-slavery societies on Mr. Garrison's model were multiplied in the free states, many lecturers were sent forth, and an extensive anti-slavery literature was created. The agitation assumed proportions that greatly encouraged its promoters and alarmed its opponents. Attempts were made to suppress it by the terror of mobs; Elijah P. Lovejoy, in 1837, at Alton, Ill., was slain while defending his press, and in 1835 Garrison was dragged through the streets of Boston with a rope around his body, his life being saved with great difficulty by lodging him in jail. Marius Robinson, an anti-slavery lecturer, in Mahoning county, Ohio, was tarred and feathered in a cruel way; Amos Dresser, a theological student, while selling cottage Bibles at Nashville, Tenn., was flogged in the public square because it happened that, without his knowledge, some of his Bibles were wrapped in cast-off antislavery papers; and in Charleston, S. C., the post-office was broken open by a mob, which made a bonfire of anti-slavery papers and tracts sent through the mails to citizens of that city. In 1840 the abolition body was rent in twain, mainly by two questions, viz.: 1. Whether they should form an anti-slavery political party. 2. Whether women should be allowed to speak and vote in their societies. On the first of these questions Mr. Garrison took the negative, on the ground that such a party would probably tend to delay rather than hasten the desired action in respect to slavery. On the second he took the affirmative, on the ground that the constitutions of the societies admitted “persons” to membership without discrimination as to sex. This division was never healed, and thenceforth Mr. Garrison was recognized chiefly as the leader of the party agreeing with him upon these two questions. Personally he was a non-resistant, and therefore a non-voter; but the great body of his friends had no such scruples, and held it to be a duty to exercise the elective franchise in opposition to slavery. In 1844 Mr. Garrison became convinced that the constitution of the United States was itself the main support of slavery, and as such was to be repudiated. Borrowing the words of Isaiah, he characterized it as “a covenant with death and an agreement with hell.” His influence carried the anti-slavery societies over to this ground, which they firmly held to the end of the conflict. Few of the members had any scruples as to forceful government. They simply declared that they could not conscientiously take part in a government that bound them by oath, in certain contingencies, to support slavery. The political party anti-slavery men went their way, leaving the work of moral agitation to Garrison and his associates, who were still a powerful body, with large resources in character, argument, and influence. The two classes, though working by divergent methods, had yet a common purpose, and, though controversy between them at times waxed warm, their agreements were broad and deep enough to insure mutual respect and a no inconsiderable degree of co-operation. The political anti-slavery leaders recognized the value of the moral agitation as a means for the regeneration of public sentiment, and for keeping their own party up to its work; and the agitators bore glad witness to the sincerity of men who, though they could not see their way clear to a repudiation of the constitution, were bent upon doing all that they could under it to baffle the designs of the slave-power. Thousands of the political abolitionists made regular and liberal contributions to sustain the work of moral agitation, and the agitators rejoiced in every display of courage on the part of their voting friends, and in whatever good they could accomplish. The civil war brought the sincere opponents of slavery, of whatever class, into more fraternal relations. Mr. Garrison was quick to see that the pro-slavery Union was destroyed by the first gun fired at Sumter, and could never be restored. Thenceforth he and his associates labored to induce the government to place the war openly and avowedly on an anti-slavery basis, and to bend all its efforts to the establishment of a new Union from which slavery should be forever excluded. In this they had the co-operation of the most enlightened and earnest leaders and members of the Republican party, and on 1 Jan., 1863, their united labors were crowned with success. President Lincoln's proclamation of freedom to the slaves was a complete vindication of the doctrine of immediate emancipation; while the conditions of reconstruction gave the country a new constitution and a new Union, so far as slavery was concerned. When the contest was over, the leaders of the Republican party united with Mr. Garrison's immediate associates in raising for him the sum of $30,000, as a token of their grateful appreciation of his long and faithful service; and after his death the city of Boston accepted and erected a bronze statue to his memory. During the struggle in which he took so prominent a part he made two visits to England, where he was received with many marks of distinction by the abolitionists of that country, as the acknowledged founder of the anti-slavery movement in the United States. The popular estimate of his character and career is doubtless expressed in the words of John A. Andrew, war-governor of Massachusetts: “The generation which immediately preceded ours regarded him only as a wild enthusiast, a fanatic, or a public enemy. The present generation sees in him the bold and honest reformer, the man of original, self-poised, heroic will, inspired by a vision of universal justice, made actual in the practice of nations; who, daring to attack without reserve the worst and most powerful oppression of his country and his time, has outlived the giant wrong he assailed, and has triumphed over the sophistries by which it was maintained.” Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. II, pp. 610-612.

 

Gay, Sidney H., New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1844-64, Corresponding Secretary, 1846-49, 1853-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gayley, Samuel M., Wilmington, Delaware, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gazzam, J. P., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gibbons, Abigail H., New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1841-44, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Gibbons, Henry, Wilmington, Delaware, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, Vice-President, 1840-43. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gibbons, James S., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-35, Executive Committee, 1839-40, 1840-44, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Gibbons, William, Wilmington, Delaware, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gibbs, Leonard, Union Village, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Gilbert, Augustus J., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gilbert, Lyman W., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Gilchrist, Archibald, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1851-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gilleland, James, Red Oak, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gillett, R. E., Oberlin, Ohio, abolitionist, Oberlin Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gillingham, Lucas, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1842-47. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Given, Rechend, abolitionist, committee member, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Glen, E. M. K., Lockpoint, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Gloucester, S. H., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Gloucester, Stephan H., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Goodell, Reverend William, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-39, editor of Genius of Temperance, editor of Emancipator

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Blue, 2005, pp. 19, 20, 23, 25, 32, 34, 50, 53, 54, 101; Harrold, 1995, pp. 11-13, 14, 34, 36, 38, 58-59, 104-105, 146-148; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 7, 22, 29, 31, 35, 46, 63, 64, 71, 72, 162-163, 199, 225; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 57-62, 113-114, 126, 130; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Goodwin, E. W., Auburn, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Goodyear, George Ashburnham, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Goss, Roswell, New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1840-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gould, Philander, Catskill, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Graham, J. T., Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Grant, Charles, Charlotte, Vermont, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Grant, Gordon, Troy, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Graves, Frederick W., Alton, Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Graves, Joshua B., Honesdale, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Green, Beriah, Whitesboro, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-37, Manager, 1837-40, agent.  (Blue, 2005, pp. 17, 34-35; Dumond, 1961, p. 180; Harrold, 1995, p. 91; Mabee, 1970; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 60, 90, 96, 97, 130; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Green, Caleb, Minnesota, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1852-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Green, Samuel A., W. Winfield, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-48. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Green, William, Jr., New York, New York, abolitionist, Treasurer, 1833-36, Executive Committee, 1834-35, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Greene, William P., Baliston Spa, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Greene, Henry K., Charlestown, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Greene, Martha W., New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Greenell, Z., Patterson, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Greenleaf, Patrick H., Portland, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Grew, Henry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839)

 

Griffin, Samuel C., Newburgh, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Grimes, John, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Grimes, Stephan, Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Grimké, Angelina Moore, women’s rights advocate (Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002, pp. 26-31, 63, 99; Yellin, 1994)

 

Grimké, Sarah Moore, women’s rights advocate (Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002, pp. 26-31, 63, 99; Yellin, 1994)

 

Grosvenor, Cyrus P., abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, Manager, 1839-40, 1840-41, Delegate of Salem and Vicinity Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839)

 

Gunn, John N., Washington, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, Vice-President, 1842-43. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Gunn, Lewis C., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Guthrie, Austin A., Putnam, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Hale, Ezekiel Jr., Haverhill, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hale, Josiah W., Brandon, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hall, Benjamin, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Hall, George, Norfield, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Hall, John S. Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hall, Robert B., New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Hallowell, Joshua L., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Halsey, Job F., Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, Missouri, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-35, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hanna, A. F., Cadiz, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hanna, Robert, Cadiz, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, 1843-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Harding, Sewall, Medway, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Harris, Andrew, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Harrison, Marcus, Decatur, Michigan, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hartt, Henry A., New York, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1860-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Haskell, Benjamin F., Cornwall, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Haskell, N. R., abolitionist, Delegate from Cleveland, Ohio, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hastings, Charles, Detroit, Michigan, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hastings, Erotas P., Detroit, Michigan, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-36, Manager, 1836-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hatch, C. B., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hathaway, Joseph C., Farmington, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, Rec. Secretary, 1840-42, 1843-44, Executive Committee, 1840-41, 1842-43, Vice-President, 1844-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hawes, Joel, Hartford, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Hawks, John M., Manchester, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1859-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hawley, A., Jamestown, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hawley, Francis, Litchfield, Connecticut, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hawley, Joesph, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Hawley, S., Clinton County, abolitionist, Clinton County Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Hawley, Orestes K., Austinburgh, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hayes, J. H., Schenectady, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Haynes, Selden, Perdy, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hayward, Josiah, Salem, Massachusetts, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Head, George, Providence, Rhode Island, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Healey, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hearn, William, Indiana, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1854-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Henry, W. P., Pawtucket, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Pawtucket Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Henshaw, Daniel, Lynn, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Henshaw, Deborah S., State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Higgins, James W., Jersey City, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hildreth, James M., New York, New York, abolitionist, Annual Meeting 1839, 1840. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hill, John W., New York, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hill, Moses, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hilton, John T., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hines, Stephen D., Sandy Hill, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hinsdill, N. B., Bennington, Vermont, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Hodges, Jonathan, Tauton, Massachusetts, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hodges, W. J., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hoit, Daniel, Sandwich, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-40, New Hampshire State Representative to American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Holbrook, Andrew S., Newark, New Jersey, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Holcomb, Jedadiah, Brandon, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hollister, David S., Wisconsin, Territory, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Holly, Sallie, agent, American Anti-Slavery Society

 

Hopkins, Josiah, Auburn, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hopkins, William, Fremont, Indiana, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1856-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hopper, Isaac T., New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1840-42, Treasurer, 1840-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hopper, John, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839, from Dantmouth. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hosford, Benjamin F., New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Hough, Ruben, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Hovey, Charles F., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1848-59. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Howe, James, Jersey City, New Jersey, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Howells, Henry C., Zanesville, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Howells, Henry C., Allegheny, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Huddard, R. B., Northampton, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hudson, Erasmus D., Torringford, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838, 1839)

 

Hudson, James, New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1841-43. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hunt, Richard P., Waterloo, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-43. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hurlbut, Joseph, Cutisville, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Hussey, Samuel F., Portland, Maine, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Hutchins, Samuel, Norridgework, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Ide, Jacob, W. Medway, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ingall, Moses, abolitionist. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Irish, Lydia C., New Lisbon, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-49, 1850-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Isham, Warren, Detroit Michigan, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Ives, Eli, New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-38. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Jackson, Edumnd, Chelsea, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1862-64, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Jackson, Francis, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1837-40, 1840-61, Executive Committee, 1840-61, Treasurer, 1844-61, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Jackson, James C., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1840-41, Corresponding Secretary, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Jackson, R., abolitionist. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Jackson, William, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-36, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

James, Fredrick, Colchester, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Janes, D. P., New London, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Janney, Joseph, Washington, DC, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-38. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Jay, John A., New York City, New York, abolitionist, New York State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Jay, William, Bedford, New York, abolitionist, Corresponding Secretary, 1835-38, Executive Committee, 1836-37.  (Blue, 2005, pp. 19, 20, 21; Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995, pp. 53, 55; Mabee, 1970; Sorin, 1971, pp. 51, 77-81, 96, 132; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Jenckes, John, Providence, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Jenkins, Huron, Delaware, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Jennings, Jonathan, Delaware, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-38. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Jessup, Silas, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Jessup, William, Montrose, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Jinnings, Thomas L., New York, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Jocelyn, Simeon S., New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, Manager, 1835-40, Executive Committee, 1835-40, officer, New England, Anti-Slavery Society.  (Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Harrold, 1995, p. 87; Mabee, 1970; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Johnson, Mary A. W., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Johnson, Nathan, New Bedford, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, 1841-42, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Johnson, Nathaniel E., New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Johnson, Oliver, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1841-43, Manager, 1852-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Johnson, Rowland, New York, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1858-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Johnson, William H., Buckingham, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-61. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Johnston, Nathan R., Topsham, Vermont, abolitionist, Vic-President, 1863-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Jones, Alphonso, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Jones, Darius, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Jones, John, Roxbury, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Jones, William R., Maryland, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Judson, A., Troy, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Judson, Gordon C., Johnstown, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)



Kanouse, Peter, Boontoon, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-38. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Keep, John, Lockport and Albion, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839)

 

Keese, Samuel, Peru, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kelley, Abbey, women’s rights advocate. (Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002, pp. 42, 49, 63, 107, 124, 190-191; Yellin, 1994)

 

Kellogg, Charles, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Kellogg, H. H., Clinton, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Kellogg, R. R., Brooklyn, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Kellogg, Spenser, Utica, New Jersey, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kenmore, Charles, New York New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Kennedy, James M., Kentucky, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1836-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kent, George, Concord, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kent, George, Concord, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ketcham, Alfred, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Kidder, J. S., Amherst, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Kimball, David T., Ipswich, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kimball, George, Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-38. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

King, Abraham O., Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

King, Leicester, Warren, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39, Vice-President, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

King, Samuel W., Danvens, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Kingsbury, H., Cleveland, Ohio, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Kingsley, Alpheus, Norwich City, Connectictut, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kinney, Ezra D., Darrien, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Kirby, Georgianna, California, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kirkland, William, Michigan, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kittridge, Ingalls, Beverly, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Knapp, Chauncey L., Montpelier, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Knapp, Isaac, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Kneuels, J. W., Newburgh, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Knight, Joseph, Peru, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)



Laird, Robert, Pleasant Valley, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Lambert, E. A., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840)

 

Lane, Anthony, New York City, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lane, Hester, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840)

 

Lane, J., Renssellanerville, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lane, Mrs. E. S., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1840)

 

Lansing, Dirck C., New York, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Lathrop, A. C., Marcellus, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lathrop, Stillman, Watertown, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lawrence, Clarrissa, Salem, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Leavitt, Harvey F., Vergennes, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Leavitt, Joshua, New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, Executive Committee, 1834-40, Recording Secretary, 1838-40 preacher, lawyer, editor of Evangelist and Emancipator.

(Blue, 2005, pp. 20, 25, 34, 45, 50, 54, 94, 119, 122; Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Harrold, 1995, pp. 7, 35, 38, 40-41, 51, 84-85, 93, 98, 136-137; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 7-8, 17, 20, 28, 29, 35, 45-47, 167, 217; Sorin, 1971, pp. 51, 68-71, 96, 131-132; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Lee, Luther, New York City, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lee, Samuel, Ipswich, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Leeds, Samuel, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

LeMoyne, Francis Julius, Washington, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, 1840-41, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Leonard, Johnathan J., Meriden, Connecticut, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1847-50, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lewis, Evan, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Lewis, William, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Libby, Peter, Buxton, Maine, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1851-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Libolt, A., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lincoln, Sumner, Gardiner, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-48, Vice-President, 1848-49, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Lines, Charles B., New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Linsley, Randolph, Meriden, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Linton, Mahlon, Bucks County, Pa, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Little, George D., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lockwood, Lewis C., New Windsor, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lockwood, Clark, Maltaville, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lockwood, Roe, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Long, Richard, Ross County, New York, abolitionist Ross County Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Loomis, H. H., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lord, Nathan, 1793-1870, Hanover, New Hampshire, abolitionist, clergyman.  American Anti-Slavery Society, Manager, 1833-1834.  (Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

LORD, Nathan, clergyman, b. in Berwick, Me., 28 Nov., 1793; d. in Hanover, N.H., 9 Sept., 1870. He was graduated at Bowdoin in 1809, and at Andover theological seminary in 1815. He was pastor of the Congregational church in Amherst, N. H., from 1816 till 1828, and at the latter date, on the resignation of Rev. Bennett Tyler, became president of Dartmouth. Under his administration the professorships of Greek literature and language, of astronomy and meteorology, of modern languages, of intellectual philosophy, and of natural history were established, three new halls and a chapel were built, the observatory was added, the “Chandler scientific department” was founded by the gift of $50,000 from Abiel Chandler, and 1,824 students were graduated. He retired in 1863. Dr. Lord upheld the institution of slavery, and thus incurred the censure of most northern people; but while he advocated his views in letters and sermons. Dartmouth was the only college in the United States for many years where colored students were admitted, and while under his care they were treated with uniform kindness and courtesy. He inclined to the old-school system of theology, and to a literal interpretation of the prophesies. Dartmouth gave him the degree of LL. D. in 1864, and Bowdoin that of D. D. in 1828. He occasionally contributed to theological reviews, edited with an introductory notice, the selected sermons of his son, Rev. John King Lord (Boston, 1850), and published numerous sermons, essays, and letters. Among the latter are “Letter to Rev. Daniel Dana, D. D., on Park's ‘Theology of New England’” (1852); “An Essay on the Millennium,” read to the General convention of New Hampshire (1854); and “Two· Letters to Ministers of all Denominations on Slavery” (1854-'5), in which he endeavored, by biblical arguments, to prove the lawfulness of that institution. Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. IV.

 

Loring, Ellis G., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-40, 1840-43, Executive Committee, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Loring, J. B., York Town, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Lovejoy, Elijah, Alton, Illinois, anti-slavery publisher, killed by a pro-slavery mob in Alton, Illinois.  (Blue, 2005, pp. 6, 20, 90-96, 105, 269; Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971, p. 60)

 

Lovejoy, Owen, Princeton, Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Loveridge, P., Weston, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Low, John, Poughkeepsie, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Lowell, James R., Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1846-57. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Luca, Alexander C., New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Ludlow, Reverend Henry G., New York, New York, clergyman, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Ludlow, James G., Cincinnati, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Lundy, Benjamin, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-34, 1837-38, 1838-40, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Lyman, Edh., New Haven, Connecticut, aboltionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Lyman, Huntington, New Orleans, Louisiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Mack, Enoch, Dover, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, Vice-President, 1841-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Magill, Jonathan P., New Hope, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, 1843-52. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Mahan, Asa, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Mann, Joel, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Marriott, Charles, Athens, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-38, Executive Committee, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Marshal, Josiah V., Dorchester, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Marot, William, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Mason, Edward, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Pawtucket Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Mason, J.W., Bangor, Maine, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

May, Samuel J., S Scituate, Massachusetts, Syracuse, New York, Brooklyn, Connecticut, Unitarian minister, abolitionist, agent, Vice-President, 1833-35, Manager, 1835-40, 1840-42, 1843-48, Vice-President, 1848-61. (Dumond, 1961, pp. 180, 182; Mabee, 1970; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

May, Samuel, Jr., Leicester, Massachusetts, abolitionist, leader, Executive Committee, 1849-64, Delegate, Windham County, Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

McClintock, Thomas, Waterloo, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-48, Vice-President, 1848-56, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

McCrummell, James (free Black), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

McDowell, Ebenezer, West Milford, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

McFarland, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

McKim, James M., Carlisle, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

McNamee, Theodore, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

McReynolds, Anthony, Wayne County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Melendy, Luther, Amherst, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42, 1845-52. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Mellen, G. W. F., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Merrill, William S., Lowell, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Merritt, Joseph, Merrit, Michigan, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1852-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Merriweather, G., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Middleton, Jonathan, New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Miles, E. E., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Miles, M. N., Newstead, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Millard, David, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Miller, Abraham, Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839, (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Miller, Jonathan P., Montpelier, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Miller, Walter, Poland, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Milligan, James, Rygate, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Millisack, Jacob, Leesburg, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1852-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Mitchell, Daniel, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1847-53, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Monthieth, John, Elyria, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Moore, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1857-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Morgan, John, Cincinnati, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Morrill, Ruth, Porland, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Morrow, James, Jefferson County, Indiana, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Moses, Theodore P., New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-45, Vice-President, 1854-59. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Mott, James, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Mott, Lucretia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1855-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Mott, Lydia, Albany, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1840-41, Vice-President, 1858-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Munsell, Luke, Kentucky, Marion County, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Murray, J. H., Johnstown, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Murray, Orson S., Orwell, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-40, 1840-44, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Murray, R. G., Herietta, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Myrick, Luther, Cazenovia, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Neall, Daniel, Jr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Needles, John, Baltimore, Maryland, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1838-40, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Nelson, David, Quincy, Illinois, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1836-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Nevin, John W., Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Newcomb, Harvey, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Newton, Calvin, Thomaston, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Nichless, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-39)

 

Nicholson, Eliza, Nantucket, Massachusetts, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Niles, W. W., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Norris, Samuel, New Market, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Norton, H. W., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Norton, John T., Farmington, Connecticut, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1838-40, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Norton, O. W., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Noyes, Jacob, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)



Oakes, William, Ipswich, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Oliver, William B., Lynn, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Osgood, Samuel, Springfield, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Paine, Armancy, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Paine, John A., Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Palmer, S., Centerville, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Parburt, G. R., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Park, John, Rochester, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Parker, Asa, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Parker, J. W., Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Parkhurst, Jonathan, Essex County, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Parkman, John, Greenfield, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Parrish, Isaac, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Parrish, Joseph, Jr., Burlington, New Jersey, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1841-46, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Patton, William, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Paul, David, New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Pearson, Aaron, Bloomfield, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Peek, D. B., Owego, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Peet, Lewis L., Brockport, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Peet, Reverand Stephen, Euclid, Ohio, clergyman, abolitionist, Western Reserve Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Peloubet, Chabrier, Bloomfield, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pennock, Abraham L., Haverford, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1835-40, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Penncock, Joseph Lyddon, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Pennypacker, Elijah, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42, 1843-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pepper, Calvin, agent (Dumond, 1961, p. 180)

 

Perkins, Francis, Norwich, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Perkins, Jared, Nashua, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Perry, Gardiner B., E. Bradford, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Perry, John M., Mendon, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Person, B., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Petell, William H., Adams, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Peterson, Henry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Pettengill, Moses, Newburyport, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Phelps, Amos A., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-35, Vice-President, 1834-35, Executive Committee, 1836-38, Recording Secretary, 1836-40. (Dumond, 1961, p. 179; Harrold, 1995, pp. 45-46, 140; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Philbrick, Samuel, Brookline, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-39)

 

Phillips, Wendell, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40, Executive Committee, 1842-64, Recording Secretary, 1845-64.  (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995, pp. 52-53, 55, 143, 152, 165, 169; Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002, pp. 125, 135, 206, 213, 224; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Phoenix, Samuel F., Wisconsin, Territory, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pierce, Isaac, New York, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-39)

 

Pierce, John B., San Francisco, California, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1850-52. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pierce, Sarah E., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

Pillsbury, Parker, Concord, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, 1843-44, 1845-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pinney, Harmon, Owego, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Platt, Zephaniah, Jackson County, Michigan, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1840-50. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Plumly, Benjamin R., Trenton, New Jersey, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1846-49. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pomeroy, Reverand Swan L., Bangor, Maine, abolitionist, clergyman, Vice-President, 1834-35, Manager, 1836-39, Delegate Anti-Slavery Society of Bangor and Vicinity (Maine). (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pond, Samuel, Bucksport, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Porter, Arthur L., Detroit, Michigan, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Porter, Benjamin, Marblehead, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Porter, Samuel D., Rochester, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Post, Albert L., Montrose, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Post, Isaac L., Westbury, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1842-43, Manager, 1843-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Post, Joseph, Westbury & Rochester, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1842-43, Manager, 1843-53, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Potter, Anson, Cranston, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Potter, Ray, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Baptist minister, lecturer, Manager, 1833-37, member Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Society. (Dumond, 1961, p. 182; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Powell, William F., New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1841-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pratt, Julius, Meriden, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Pratt, Sarah, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Prentice, John, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, Delegate Providence Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Preston, Jonas, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Puckett, Clarkson, Winchester, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1846-52, Vice-President, 1852-54. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Pugh, Achilles, Society of Friends, Quaker, newspaper printer

 

Pugh, Sarah, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-44, Executive Committee, 1844-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Purvis, Joseph, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Purvis, Robert (free Black), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-40, 1840-42, Vice-President, 1842-64. (Mabee, 1970, pp. 21, 57, 58, 99, 106, 109, 111, 121, 181, 192, 265, 276, 294, 305, 321, 338; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Quincy, Edmund, Dedham, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40, 1840-42, Executive Committee, 1843-64, Vice-President, 1848-64, Corresponding Secretary, 1853-56. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Quintard, James, Norwalk, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)



Rand, Asa, Lowell, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Randal, Jesse, Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Randall, Daniel B., Hallowell, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Rankin, John, New York, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35, Executive Committee, 1834-40, Treasurer, 1836-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Rankin, John, Ripley, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-38, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ray, Charles B., New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Raymond, J. S., New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Reason, Patrick, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Reed, George B., Deep River, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Reed, Samuel, Abington, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Reid, William W., Rochester, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Remond, Charles L., Massachusetts and Maine, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1843-48, Manager, 1848-53, Agent, Maine Anti-Slavery Society 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Renshaw, Charles Stuart, agent. (Dumond, 1961, p. 182; Sernett, 2002, p. 43)

 

Rhodes, John, Troy, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Rice, Fordyce, Cazenovia, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Richardson, Charles L., Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1843-48. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Rider, Thomas, P., East Bridgewater, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Ripley, George B., Norwich, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Ritter, Thomas, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Robbins, Sampson, Lockport, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Roberts, Daniel Jr., Manchester, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Robeson, Andrew, New Bedford, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-, 1843-53, 1862-63. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Robin, D. L., New Hampshire, abolitionist, Agent, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Robinson, Andrew, Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Robinson, Christopher, Lynn, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Robinson, Ezekial, East Pittston, Maine, abolitionist, Maine Delegate, Agent American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Robinson, J. F., abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Robinson, John, Troy, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Robinson, Marius R., Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1840-43. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Robinson, Rowland T., N. Ferrisburg, Vermont, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1835-40, 1840-43, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Rockwell, Reuben, Colebrook, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Rodman, Samuel, New Bedford, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Rogers, Nathaniel P., Concord, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, 1842-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Rogers, William C., Utica, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Root, David, Dover, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-40, Delegate. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ropes, George, Portland, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1842-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ruggles, David, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Rush, Christopher, New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Russell, George, Boston, Masschuetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Russell, Philemon R., W. Boylston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)



Safford, A. H., Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Sailer, John, Michigan City, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sanborn, John, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sands, D. H., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Sanger, Abner, Danvens, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Sargent, John T., Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1862-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sawyer, Leicester A., New Haven, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Savage, Amos, Utica, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Scofield, Abishai, Petersborough, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Scott, David, Albany, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Scott, James, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Scott, Orange, Lowell, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Sellers, George, Delaware County, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Sellers, John, Jr., Delaware, County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-45, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Sewall, Charles, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sewall, Samuel, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sexton, Pliny, Palyra, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1852-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Shadd, Abraham, Chester County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sharp, George, Stratford, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37, 1841-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sharp, H. D., New York, New York, abolitionist, Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society 1838-1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sharp, Robert Davis, Plainfield, Connecticut, abolitionist, Plainfield (Conn.) and vicinity Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Shearman, H. B., Rochester, Troy, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Shedd, James A., Iowa, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1854-57. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Shepard, George B., Hallowell, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sherwood, J. M., Newburgh, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Shipherd, Fayette, Troy, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Shipley, Thomas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Simmons, Anthony, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1841-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sisson, Joseph, Jr., Pawtucket, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, 1846-47. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Slaton, James, Vermont, abolitionist, Manager, 1844-49. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sleeper, Reuben, Mount Morris, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Sleight, John W., Poughkeepsie, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Smith, Alfred, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Smith, Ezra C., New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-45, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Smith, George H., Salem, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Smith, Gerrit, Peterboro, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1836-40, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Smith, Israel, Bainbridge, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Smith, James McCune, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Smith, James W., New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Smith, Samuel, Delaware, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1837-38. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Smith, Stephan S., Roxbury, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Roxbury Massachusetts Delegate to American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839)

 

Smith, Stephen, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1845-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Smith, William, Delegate of the Oneida Institute, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Smyth, William, Brunswick, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Southard, Nathaniel, New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1840-41, New York State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839)

 

Southmayd, Daniel S., Lowell, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Southwick, Edward, Augusta, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Southwick, Joseph, Maine and Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Southwick, Thankful, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Spaulding, Timothy, La Porte County, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Spencer, Thomas, Salem, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Spooner, Bourne, Plymouth, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1845-53, Vice-President, 1863-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sprague, Seth, Duxbury, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-48, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Springstead, Mary, Cazenovia, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

St. Claire, Alanson, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Massachusetts State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839)

 

Stanley, Stephan, Auburn, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Stanley, William H., New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stanton, Benjamin, Marlboro, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stanton, Henry B., Cincinnati, Ohio, New York, New York, abolitionist, public relations, finance, executive committee, agent, husband of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Manager, 1834-38, Corresponding Secretary, 1838-40, Executive Committee, 1838-40.  (Sernett, 2002, pp. 43-44; Van Broeken, 2002, pp. 13-15, 22-23, 26, 31-32, 60, 87; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stebbins, Giles B., Wisconsin, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1850-51, 1851-52, Manager, 1852-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stedmen, William, Randolph, Ohio, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1848-56. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sterling, John M., Cleveland, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stern, Nathaniel, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stevens, Silas, Honesdale, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Stewart, Alvan, Utica, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35, Manager, 1837-40, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Stewart, Robert, Ross County, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-40, Vice-President, 1840-50. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stewart, William, Illinois, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stillman, Edwin A., abolitionist, Delegate Middletown Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Stocking, Samuel, New York, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stone, Lucy, Agent American Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stone, T. T., East Machias, Main, abolitionist State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Storrs, George, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-36, Vice-President, 1835-37, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839 (Sernett, 2002, p. 43; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Storrs, Nathan, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stow, Baron, Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Strong, Butler, Wethersfield, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-52. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Stuart, Robert, Detroit, Michigan, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sugar, Nathan, Marshalton, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sunderland, LaRoy, Massachusetts, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-36, 1836-37, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Swaim, Mary A., Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1846-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Sweany, Alexander, Washington Country, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Sweet, Samuel N., Adams, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Tanner, Abel, Warwick, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Tanner, William, Warwick, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Tappan, Arthur, Brooklyn, New York.

 

Tappan, Lewis Northey, 1788-1873, New York, NY, merchant, radical abolitionist leader.  Co-founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society, December 1833.  Member of the Executive Committee of the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1840-1855, Treasurer, 1840-1842, Secretary, 1842-1844, Corresponding Secretary, 1845-1846, 1848-1855.  Leader of the Philadelphia Free Produce Association.  Wrote Life.

(Blue, 2005; Burin, 2005, p. 89; Dumond, 1961, pp. 159, 218, 287; Filler, 1960, pp. 26, 31, 50, 55, 61, 63, 68, 72, 94, 102, 130, 136, 138, 144, 150, 152, 158, 164, 165, 168, 174, 177, 189, 194, 210, 247, 262; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970, pp. 8, 9, 13-19, 21, 24, 26, 38, 42-49, 51, 55, 58, 91, 93, 104, 105, 130, 190, 151-156, 190, 202, 219-221, 226-229, 233, 234, 251-253, 257, 334, 340, 341, 343, 344, 345; Mitchell, 2007; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 106, 161, 162, 163, 166, 174, 290, 362; Sorin, 1971, pp. 70, 93, 96, 102, 113, 114, 131; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, pp. 32-34; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 9, Pt. 2, p. 203; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 21, p. 311; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 321; Tappan, Lewis. Life of Arthur Tappan. New York, Hurd and Houghton: 1870; Hinks, Peter P., & John R. McKivigan, Eds., Encyclopedia of Antislavery and Abolition.  Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood, 2007, Vol. 2, pp. 673-675; Wyatt-Brown, Bertram, Lewis Tappan and the Evangelical War against Slavery, 1969; Staudenraus, P. J. The African Colonization Movement, 1816-1865. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961, pp. 76, 128-129, 219, 228, 230; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

TAPPAN, Lewis, merchant, b. in Northampton, Mass., 23 May, 1788; d. in Brooklyn, N. Y., 21 June, 1873, received a good education, and at the age of sixteen became clerk in a dry-goods house in Boston. His employers subsequently aided him in establishing himself in business, and he became interested m calico-print works and in the manufacture of cotton. In 1827 he removed to New York and became a member of the firm of Arthur Tappan and Co., and his subsequent career was closely identified with that of his brother Arthur. With the latter he established in 1828 the “Journal of Commerce,” of which he became sole owner in 1829. In 1833 he entered with vigor into the anti-slavery movement, in consequence of which his house was sacked and his furniture was destroyed by a mob in July, 1834, and at other times he and his brother suffered personal violence. He was also involved in the crisis of 1837, and afterward withdrew from the firm and established the first mercantile agency in the country, which he conducted with success. He was chief founder of the American missionary association, of which he was treasurer and afterward president, and was an early member of Plymouth church, Brooklyn. He published the life of his brother mentioned above, but afterward joined in the free-soil movement at its inception. He was widely known for his drollery and wit and for his anti-slavery sentiments. Judge Tappan published “Cases decided in the Court of Common Pleas,” with an appendix (Steubenville, 1831). Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, pp. 32-34.

 

 

Tappan, Weare, Newport, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1844-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Tapping, Lewis, Iowa Territory, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Teall, H. V., Schenctady, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Thatcher, Moses, N. Wrentham, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Thomas, N. P., Whippany, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Thome, Arthur, Augusta, Kentucky, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Thome, James A., Augusta, Kentucky, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Thompson, Cyrus, LeRoy, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Thompson, E. N., Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1835-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Thompson, George, agent. (Dumond, 1961, p. 182; Harrold, 1995, pp. 68, 71-75, 104, 166, 168; Mabee, 1970, p. 29; Van Broeken, 2002, pp. 17-18, 21, 63, 86, 94, 100, 118)

 

Thompson, Otis, Rehoboth, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Thompson, Samuel, Poughkeepsie, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Thurber, Philip, Rochester, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Thurston, David, Winthrop, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Tilden, William P., Concord, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1843-48, Manager, 1848-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Tillson, Joseph, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Tomlinson, Carver, Illinois, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1858-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Torbet, A. M., Paterson, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Torrey, Charles T., Salem, Massachusetts, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Townsend, Paul, Westfield, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Tracy, F. D., Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Tracy, Mrs. G. M., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Tracy, George M., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Trask, Isreal, Beverly, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Treadwell, S. B., Rochester, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Trevor, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Tucker, J.T., Madison County, New York, Madison County Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Turner, Asa, Jr., Quincy, Illinois, Iowa, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Turney, John, Weston, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Tuthill, George M., Amherst, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Tuttle, Uriel, Torrington, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

True, E. W., Pittsford, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Twining, William, Madison, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Tyson, Samuel, Norriston, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-1839)



Underwood, A., Poughkeepsie, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Underwood, James, New Sharon, Maine, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)



Van Epps, Abraham, Vernon, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Van Vliet, Peter, Iowa Territory, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Van Rensellaer, Thomas, New York, New York, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1840-42, Manager, 1840-42, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Vashon, John B., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Vose, Richard H., Augusta, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)



Walker, Amasa, Boston, Massachusetts, Oberlin, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, 1840-41, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Walker, John, Gurnsey County, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wallin, James, New York New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Ward, George, Plymouth, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Ward, S. R., Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Warren, James, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Warner, N. B., Milford, New Hampshire, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Warren, Waters, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Waterhouse, William, Boston, Massachusetts, Boston Wesleyan Anti-Slavery Society, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Watkins, William, Baltimore, Maryland, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wattles, John O., Clermont County, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Webb, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Weeks, William R., Newark, New Jersey, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-39, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Weld, Theodore Dwight, 1803-1895, Cincinnati, Ohio, New York, NY, reformer, abolitionist leader, anti-slavery lobbyist.  Co-founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS) in December 1833.  Manager, 1833-1835, and Corresponding Secretary, 1839-1840, of the Society.  Published American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses (1839).  Also wrote The Bible Against Slavery (1839) and Slavery and the Internal Slave Trace in the United States (London, 1841).  Married to abolitionist Angelina Grimké. 

(Barnes, 1933; Drake, 1950, pp. 138, 140, 158, 173; Dumond, 1961, pp. 161, 176, 180, 183, 185, 220, 240-241; Filler, 1960, pp. 32, 56, 67, 72, 102, 148, 156, 164, 172, 176, 206; Hammond, 2011, pp. 268, 273; Mabee, 1970, pp. 17, 33, 34, 38, 92, 93, 104, 146, 151, 152, 153, 187, 188, 191, 196, 348, 358; Pease, 1965, pp. 94-102; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 46, 106, 321-323, 419, 486, 510-512; Sorin, 1971, pp. 42-43, 53, 60, 64, 67, 70n; Thomas, 1950; Abolitionist, Vol. I, No. XII, December, 1833; Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI, p. 425; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936, Vol. 10, Pt. 1, p. 625; American Reformers: An H.W. Wilson Biographical Dictionary, New York, 1985, pp. 681-682; American National Biography, Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, Vol. 22, p. 928; The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. II. New York: James T. White, 1892, p. 318; Hinks, Peter P., & John R. McKivigan, Eds., Encyclopedia of Antislavery and Abolition.  Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood, 2007, Vol. 2, pp. 740-741; Abzug, Robert H. Passionare Liberator: Theodore Dwight Weld and the Dilemma of Reform, New York, 1980; Dumond, Dwight L., ed., Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimké Weld and Sarah Grimké, 1822-144, 1965; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

Biography from Appletons’ Cyclopaedia of American Biography:

WELD, Theodore Dwight, reformer, b. in Hampton, Conn., 23 Nov., 1803. He entered Phillips Andover academy in 1819, but was not graduated, on account of failing eyesight. In 1830 he became general agent of the Society for the promotion of manual labor in literary institutions, publishing afterward a valuable report (New York, 1833). He entered Lane theological seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1833, but left that institution on the suppression of the Anti-slavery society of the seminary by the trustees. Mr. Weld then became well known as an anti-slavery lecturer, but in 1836 he lost his voice, and was appointed by the American anti-slavery society editor of its books and pamphlets. In 1841-'3 he labored in Washington in aid of the anti-slavery members of congress, and in 1854 he established at Eagleswood, N. J., a school in which he received pupils irrespective of sex and color. In 1864 he removed to Hyde Park, near Boston, and devoted himself to teaching and lecturing. Mr. Weld is the author of many pamphlets, and of “The Power of Congress over the District of Columbia” (New York, 1837); “The Bible against Slavery” (1837); “American Slavery as it Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses” (1839); and “Slavery and the Internal Slave Trade in the United States” (London, 1841). Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1888, Vol. VI. pp. 425.

 

Wells, Darius, Johnstown, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Wells, Eleazer M., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wells, Samuel, Whitesboro, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wells, Woolsey, Akron, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Welton, Alonzo, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1838-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wess, Samuel, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Westervelt, James, New York, New York, abolitionist, Delegate to the Annual Meeting, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Weston, Anne Warren, Weymouth, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1843-64, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Wetmore, E. P., abolitionist, Delegate Middletown Anti-Slavery Society. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Wetmore, Lauren, New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1851-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wetmore, Reverend O., Utica, New York, abolitionist, Delegate. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Whipple, Charles K., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Manager, 1836-37, Executive Committee, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Whipple, George, Oberlin, Ohio, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Whipple, John N., Coventry, Rhode Island, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Whitcomb, James, Michigan, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Whitcomb, James, Indiana, Brooklyn, Connecticut, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41, Vice-President, 1850-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

White, James, Essex County, New Jersey, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Whiting, N. H., Marshfield, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Whiting, William E., Brooklyn, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Whitman, A. L., Norwick, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Whitman, Isaac, Bangor, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-34. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Whitney, N. E., Brooklyn, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Whitson, Thomas, Coopersville, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37, 1840-41, Vice-President, 1850-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Whitson, Thomas, Coopersville, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-42, Vice-President, 1852-64. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Whittier, John Greenleaf, Haverhill, Massachusetts, author, poet, journalist, radical abolitionist, Manager, 1833-38, 1838-40.  (Blue, 2005, pp. 5, 37-47, 49-50, 52-53, 63, 248-249, 259, 264; Dumond, 1961, p. 179; Harrold, 1995, pp. 56, 78, 140; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 12, 54, 58, 162, 230, 243; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wichell, John, Illinois, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1851-57. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wilcox, A., Painesville, Ohio, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Wilcox, A. O., New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Wilcox, Edwin, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Wiley, Charles, Northampton, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Williams, A. F., Farmington, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-39. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838-39)

 

Williams, George H., New York, New York, abolitionist, Annual Meeting, 1839, 1840. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Williams, Herbert, LaPorte County, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40, Vice-President, 1840-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Williams, Peter, New York, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Williams, Peter, New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-36, Executive Committee, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Williams, Samuel, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-37. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Williams, Thomas, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-34. Delegate, Providence Anti-Slavery Society. (Dumond, 1961, p. 180; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Willson, James R., Newburgh, New York, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Wilmarth, Morris, Attebury, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Wilsmarth, Lucinda, Providence, Rhode Island, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wilson, Daniel, Indiana, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1844-52. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wilson, David, Illinois, Richmond, Indiana, abolitionist, Manager, 1841-42, 1842-46. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wilson, Hiram, New York, abolitionist, American Anti-Slavery Society, New York State Society, 1838

 

Wilson, J. R., Coldenham, New Jersey, abolitionist, Vice-President, 1834-35. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wilson, James, Keene, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1833-36. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wilson, W. L., Middletown, Connecticut, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Winchell, William S., Sangenfield, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Winslow, Nathan, Portland, Maine, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-40, 1840-44, Vice-President, 1844-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wise, Daniel, Quincy, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834)

 

Wood, Amos, Concord, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1845-53. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Woodard, A., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Woodbury, C., Manchester, Massachusetts, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Woodbury, Silas, Michigan, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Woodford, Sidney, Farmington, Ohio, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Wooster, H., Deep River, Connecticut, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Worth, Edmund, Fisherville, New Hampshire, abolitionist, Manager, 1839-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wright, Elizur, Jr., abolitionist, Vice-President, 1833-35, Secretary, 1833-39, corresponding secretary, professor of mathematics and natural philosophy, Western Reserve College. (Dumond, 1961, pp. 177-182; Harrold, 1995, pp. 40, 76, 81, 143; Mabee, 1970, pp. 189, 190, 256, 322, 339, 365; Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wright, Francis, Utica, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1843-45. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wright, Henry C., Boston, Massachusetts, abolitionist, Executive Committee, 1859-64, Delegate, 1838-1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wright, James A., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838)

 

Wright, Josiah, Syracuse, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Wright, Peter, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1837-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wright, R. P. G., Schenectady, New York, abolitionist, State Delegate to the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society, 1839)

 

Wright, Richard S., Schenectady, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wright, Theodore S., New York, New York, abolitionist, Manager, 1834-40, Executive Committee, 1834-40. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wright, William, Adams County, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-41. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)

 

Wyman, Jonas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, abolitionist, Manager, 1840-44. (Annual Reports, American Anti-Slavery Society)


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References

(Barnes, 1933; Blue, 2005, pp. 17, 20-21, 31, 42-43, 45, 48-49, 61, 94; Bracy, 1971; Drake, 1950, pp. 162, 140-147, 153-155, 179-180; Dumond, 1961, pp. 175, 177-182, 185, 259-260, 267, 268, 271, 272, 284-285, 295; Filler, 1960, pp. 66, 72, 97, 129; Friedman, 1982; Harrold, 1995, pp. 6, 54, 55, 59, 61, 85; Mabee, 1970, pp. 2, 4, 22-26, 31, 33, 37, 38, 40, 57, 69, 72, 88, 131, 151, 187, 189, 215, 235, 245, 247, 249, 265, 277, 293, 322, 324, 338, 359, 387; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 4-7, 12-14, 16-17, 19, 223, 237, 242-244; Perry, 1995; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 53, 105, 106, 152, 161-162, 189, 288, 290-291, 305-306, 308-309, 321-322, 344, 363, 346, 453, 522; Sernett, 2002; Sorin, 1971, pp. xii, 31, 51, 59, 65, 73n, 74, 75, 79, 87, 93, 95; Yellin, 1994, pp. 6-7, 18, 27, 31-32, 39, 43, 76, 79, 159, 133, 161-162, 174-176, 190, 235, 244, 250, 273, 288-289, 323, 325-326)